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419th Troop Carrier Group

419th Troop Carrier Group


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419th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF)

History - Books - Aircraft - Time Line - Commanders - Main Bases - Component Units - Assigned To

History

The 419th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) ran transport terminals that helped to organise the activities of other transport units.

The group was activated on Guam on 31 January 1945, but only as a headquarters. During the Second World War it never had any squadrons attached, or any aircraft of its own. Instead the group had detachments at Guam, Saipan, Tinian and Anguar (this detachment moved to Iwo Jima in March).

Each of these detachments operated a transport terminal, organising the movement of cargo and personnel through these key locations. The group thus played a key part in the efficient operation of the vast transport network, despite its lack of aircraft.

The group was inactivated in Guam on 15 February 1946. It was re-activated in 1947 in the reserve, this time with squadrons attached.

Books

Pending

Aircraft

None

Timeline

1 Dec 1944Constituted as 419th Troop Carrier Group
31 Jan 1945Activated on Guam
15 Feb 1946Inactivated

Commanders (with date of appointment)

Capt Vernon C Dang: 1Feb 1945
Maj Victor C Swearingen: 5Mar 1945
Col Frank H Mears: 10 May1945
Lt Col Victor C Swearingen: 6 Aug1945
Maj John B Wakefield Jr: 19 Aug1945
Capt Vernon C Dang: 10 Nov 1945
Capt John L Boggs, 21 Nov 1945-unkn

Main Bases

Guam: 31 Jan 1945-15 Feb 1946

Component Units

None in this period

Assigned To

1945: Seventh Air Force


Ardmore Air Force Base

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Ardmore Air Force Base is an inactive United States Air Force base, approximately 11 miles northeast of Ardmore, Oklahoma. It was active during World War II as a heavy bomber training airfield and during the early years of the Cold War as a troop carrier base. It was closed on 31 March 1959.


Contents

Activated on Guam on 31 January 1945. Assigned to Seventh Air Force. From late January 1945 to mid-February 1946 the 419th Troop Carrier Group's headquarters was assigned neither squadrons nor aircraft, but was composed primarily of a few detachments on Saipan, Tinian, Guam (all in the Mariana Islands), and Angaur (in the Palau Islands), the latter detachment moving to Iwo Jima in March 1945. The detachments operated transportation terminals that assisted in moving troops, equipment, food, and mail to, and in evacuating personnel from, combat areas.

When activated again, the 419th controlled several Reserve units at five separate locations. In mid-1949 the group moved without personnel or equipment to Scott AFB, IL, where it became the combat component of the new 419th Troop Carrier Wing. Group pilots trained in T-6, T-7, T-11, and C/TC-47 aircraft until c. March 1951.

Beginning July 1956, the group (and its three squadrons) trained in C-123 assault airlift operations. For the next 16 months the group airlifted, airdropped, and airlanded troops and cargo to support tactical operations, special missions, and U.S. Army and joint airborne exercises, worldwide.

From August 1992 it trained for and flew fighter missions. Between December 1994 and February 1995, took part patrols to enforce the no-fly zone over northern Iraq.


419th Fighter Wing

The 419th Fighter Wing (419 FW) is an Air Reserve Component (ARC) unit of the United States Air Force. It is assigned to the Tenth Air Force, Air Force Reserve Command, and is stationed at Hill Air Force Base, Utah.

The 419th FW is an associate unit of the 388th Fighter Wing, Air Combat Command (ACC) and if mobilized the wing is gained by ACC.

Overview

The mission of the wing is to Fly, Fight and Win. To accomplish that mission, the wing trains and equips an F-16 squadron to be capable of worldwide mobility to perform a wide variety of air-to-air and air-to-ground fighter missions. 419th members are trained in a variety of specialties to include operations, maintenance, civil engineering, security, supply, transportation and communications.

The wing was the last wing to fly F-105 aircraft, and in early 1984 was the first Air Force Reserve wing to fly F-16s. Personnel of the 419th deploy periodically for contingencies and training exercises, some overseas. Some 350 members were deployed December 1994 through February 1995 to Incirlik Air Base, Turkey to patrol the no-fly zone over northern Iraq during Operation Provide Comfort II.

In 2015, it transitioned to an Associate unit and became the first Air Force Reserve fighter wing to fly the F-35A Lightning II.

Units

The 419th Fighter Wing is divided into three subordinate groups which supervise nine squadrons and four flights. Additionally, the wing oversees a medical squadron that reports directly to the commander. Several staff agencies such as plans, safety, quality, financial management, public affairs and the legal office form the wing commander's headquarters section staff.

  • The 419th Operations Group plans and organizes operational programs and establishes policies and procedures for operational training functions. It directs, monitors and supports operations programs, including flight operations, standardization/evaluation, weapons and tactics, intelligence, operations and training and life support. The wing's designated flying squadron is the 466th Fighter Squadron. Pilots from the unit train for both air-to-air and air-to-ground attack missions in the F-16 C/D model aircraft.
  • The 419th Maintenance Group plans, organizes and establishes programs, policies and procedures in support of the unit's flying missions and contingency operations. Subordinate units include the 419th Maintenance Squadron, the 419th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, and 419th Maintenance Operations Flight. These units train personnel, provide required resources at home and deployed locations, and maintain the wing's aircraft. The 419th Combat Logistics Support Squadron also falls under the Maintenance Group. Its wartime mission is to deploy teams worldwide to accomplish rapid Aircraft Battle Damage Repair and packing operations.
  • The 419th Mission Support Group provides non-tactical support for the operational mission of the 419th Fighter Wing. It provides programs and support to the Security Forces, Communications, Civil Engineer and Mission Support Squadrons. The 419th Security Forces Squadron provides resource protection, system security and base defense missions. The 419th Civil Engineer Squadron provides pre-attack and post-attack civil engineering support necessary to maintain aircraft operations. The 419th Mission Support Flight provides administrative support for the operational mission of the wing. The 419th Logistics Readiness Squadron is responsible for managing personnel and materiel resources. The 67th Aerial Port Squadron also falls under the Mission Support Group. Its members load and unload air freight arriving from and departing for points worldwide.

History

The 419th Group trained in the Reserve for troop carrier operations from 1949 to 1951.

The Air Force Reserve has maintained a flying mission at Hill Air Force Base for more than 45 years. When activated in March 1947, the 419th Group was earmarked to control seven Reserve units, the first of which was a rescue squadron.

During a two-year period, the 419th Group gained several components, spanning five separate locations and three Air Force organizations. Group pilots trained until March 1951 when training ceased and the entire 419th prepared for entry into active service. Activated in July 1956 as a component of the Regular Air Force, the group and its three squadrons trained in C-123 Provider assault airlift operations.

In 1972, the Air Force Reserve modernization program added fighter aircraft which resulted in the unit gaining F-105 Thunderchief aircraft. Consequently, the unit was re-designated the 508th Fighter Group.

On 1 October 1982, the unit was upgraded from a group to a wing, being redesignated the 419th Tactical Fighter Wing. It was the last operational F-105 unit in the Air Force until its conversion to F-16s in January 1984.

More than one hundred 419th members were called to active duty in support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm (1991–1992). They served in Saudi Arabia, Europe and at stateside military installations.

Approximately 350 members of the 419th Fighter Wing deployed to Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, in support of Operation Provide Comfort II from 3 December 1994 through 16 February 1995. The wing's pilots flew more than 500 sorties, compiling more than 1,400 flight hours enforcing the no-fly zone over northern Iraq.

The wing demonstrated its combat capability in a return trip to Incirlik Air Base in June 1997 to support Operation Northern Watch. The unit's show of force was significant as it deployed 12 aircraft and nearly 400 people to the region to deter the Iraqi military from terrorizing its neighbors. In 1998, the 466th Fighter Squadron deployed 6 aircraft and 93 Reservists to Kuwait in support of Operation Southern Watch.

In June 1999, the 419th Fighter Wing's deployment to Incirlik Air Base, Turkey marked the first time the Reserve supported a contingency operation by employing precision-guided munitions. After being fired upon by the Iraqi military, pilots utilized Low Altitude Targeting Infrared for Night (LANTIRN) technology to destroy enemy targets with pinpoint accuracy.

419th FW members deployed to Incirlik Air Base in June 2000 where they became the first Reserve unit ever to use a new precision strike capability known as LITENING II in a contingency operation. Their F-16s equipped with the LITENING II technology, 419th pilots helped keep the Iraqi military in check flying 95 combat missions over a 28-day period.

In October 2001, the 419th returned to the Middle East as part of Air Expeditionary Force-8. Wing members used the LITENING II precision strike capability to enforce the no-fly zone over southern Iraq for 19 days.

While deployed, 419th pilots assisted in the United States' war on terrorism by logging combat missions over Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom. That same month, 419th Security Forces members and Civil Engineers were mobilized and spent 18 months providing security at Air Force installations stateside and overseas.

Members of the wing's 466th Fighter Squadron supported the North American Aerospace Defense Command by flying combat air patrols at undisclosed locations from 21 December 2001 to 1 January 2002. The wing filled each 8-hour CAP responsibility by utilizing volunteer Reservists and Air Reserve Technicians.

In January 2003, over 100 members of the 419th departed Utah to enforce the no-fly zone over southern Iraq. Once deployed, members were called to active-duty to participate in Operation Iraqi Freedom. During the war, pilots delivered precision-guided weapons on Iraqi command and control facilities, munitions bunkers, radar sites and other key military targets. Several members earned Bronze Star awards and Distinguished Flying Crosses (with heroism) for their actions.

Reservists from the 419th Medical Squadron, 419th Security Forces Squadron and 67th Aerial Port Squadron all supported contingency operations in Iraq in 2004.


Contents

Activated on Guam on 31 January 1945. Assigned to Seventh Air Force. From late January 1945 to mid-February 1946 the 419th Troop Carrier Group's headquarters was assigned neither squadrons nor aircraft, but was composed primarily of a few detachments on Saipan, Tinian, Guam (all in the Mariana Islands), and Angaur (in the Palau Islands), the latter detachment moving to Iwo Jima in March 1945. The detachments operated transportation terminals that assisted in moving troops, equipment, food, and mail to, and in evacuating personnel from, combat areas.

When activated again, the 419th controlled several Reserve units at five separate locations. In mid-1949 the group moved without personnel or equipment to Scott AFB, IL, where it became the combat component of the new 419th Troop Carrier Wing. Group pilots trained in T-6, T-7, T-11, and C/TC-47 aircraft until c. March 1951.

Beginning July 1956, the group (and its three squadrons) trained in C-123 assault airlift operations. For the next 16 months the group airlifted, airdropped, and airlanded troops and cargo to support tactical operations, special missions, and U.S. Army and joint airborne exercises, worldwide.

From August 1992 it trained for and flew fighter missions. Between December 1994 and February 1995, took part patrols to enforce the no-fly zone over northern Iraq.

Lineage

  • Established as 419th Troop Carrier Group on 1 December 1944
  • Activated in the Reserve on 22 March 1947
  • Redesignated 419th Troop Carrier Group, Assault, Fixed Wing on 24 February 1956
  • Redesignated: 419th Military Airlift Group on 31 July 1985 (Remained inactive)
  • Redesignated: 419th Operations Group on 1 August 1992

Assignments

  • Central Pacific Base Command, 31 January 1945 , 6 December 1945 , 1 January 1946
  • Far East Air Service Command, 1–15 February 1946 , 22 March 1947
    , 17 October 1947
    , 27 June 1949 – 2 May 1951 , 9 July 1956
    , 1 September – 11 December 1957
    , 1 August 1992–present

Components

  • 12th Rescue Squadron: 22 March 1947 – 27 June 1949 : 30 September 1947 – 27 June 1949 : 21 June 1947 – 27 June 1949 : 3 August 1947 – 27 June 1949 : 9 August 1947 – 27 June 1949 : 3 August 1947 – 27 June 1949 : 11 April 1948 – 27 June 1949
  • 339th Troop Carrier Squadron: 27 June 1949 – 2 May 1951 9 July 1956 – 11 December 1957
  • 340th Troop Carrier Squadron: 27 June 1949 – 2 May 1951 9 July 1956 – 11 December 1957
  • 341st Troop Carrier Squadron: 27 June 1949 – 2 May 1951 9 July 1956 – 11 December 1957
  • 342d Troop Carrier Squadron: 27 June 1949 – 2 May 1951 : 1 August 1992–present

Stations

    , Guam, Marianas Islands, 31 January 1945 – 15 February 1946 , Virginia, 22 March 1947 , Illinois, 27 June 1949 – 2 May 1951 , Oklahoma, 9 July 1956 – 11 December 1957 , Utah, 1 August 1992–present

Aircraft


The 439th Operations Group consists of the following units:

World War II [ edit | edit source ]

Douglas C-47A-80-DL Serial 43-15159 of the 94th Troop Carrier Squadron in Normady Invasion Markings.

C-47s of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron practicing the "pick up" method of towing a glider, Upottery, May 1944.

Trained in the U.S. with C-47s, 1943-Jan1944. Moved to England, February–March 1944, for duty with Ninth Air Force.

The group began operations by dropping paratroops of the 101st Airborne Division in Normandy on D-Day (6 June 1944) and releasing gliders with reinforcements on the following day. The group received a Distinguished Unit Citation and a French citation for these missions. After the Normandy invasion the group ferried supplies in the United Kingdom until the air echelon was sent to Italy in July to transport cargo to Rome and evacuate wounded personnel. The detachment dropped paratroops of the 517th Parachute Infantry Regiment along the Riviera in support of the invasion of Southern France on 15 August, and later towed gliders to provide reinforcements for these missions the group earned another citation from the French government. After the air echelon returned to England on 25 August the group resumed its cargo missions.

After moving to France in September, the group dropped paratroops of the 82nd Airborne Division near Nijmegen and towed gliders carrying reinforcements during the airborne attack on Holland. In December, it participated in the Battle of the Bulge by releasing gliders with supplies for the 101st Airborne Division near Bastogne. When the Allies made the air assault across the Rhine River in March 1945, each aircraft of the 439th towed two gliders with troops of the 17th Airborne Division and released them near Wesel. The group also hauled food, clothing, medicine, gasoline, ordnance equipment, and other supplies to the front lines and evacuated patients to rear zone hospitals. It converted from C-47s to C-46s and the 439th used the new aircraft to transport displaced persons from Germany to France and Belgium after V-E Day.

The group returned to the U.S. during the period July–September 1945, and trained with C-46 aircraft until inactivated.

Air Force Reserve [ edit | edit source ]

From June 1949, the group trained in troop carrier operations until mobilized in April 1951, its personnel being used as fillers for USAF organizations worldwide during the Korean War

Activated in the Reserve on 15 June 1952, the group trained in fighter-bomber operations until phased out in September 1957 when the wing adopted the Tri-Deputate organization.

On 8 January 1966 the 439th replaced the 1602d Air Transport Group at Rhein-Main AB, Germany. The group controlled assigned and attached Military Airlift Command airlift units at Rhein-Main, provided air transport and air evacuation services within and occasionally outside Europe. Earned an Air Force Outstanding Unit Award for May–June 1967 support during the Middle East crisis.

Since 1 August 1992 the group has trained for and flown global airlift operations, transporting personnel, equipment, and supplies and participating in numerous exercises.


419th Troop Carrier Group - History

Help! Someone stationed at Ardmore Army Air Field during WWII or the Korean War completed eight waterbased color paintings depicting Army life on a barrack interior wall. The unsigned art, each approximately 3 x 3- feet, is displayed in the Military Memorial Museum, Ardmore, OK. If you are familiar with these paintings and know or remember the artist, please contact by email or snail-mail, Military Memorial Museum, 35 Sunset Drive, P.O. Box 225, Ardmore, OK, 73402. We want to give credit to the artist and if possible record the story of his/her military experience at Ardmore and beyond. Thanks for any information you can provide!

Memory Joggers 1942-46 1953-59 / Making It Happen 1942-461953-59 / This I Remember. / In Memory Of
A Small-World, God-Directed, Get-Together / A Story Of Survival / Historical Summary 1942-46, 1953-59 / A Mural of Remembrance The Beginning

Some of the best Washita River bottom land in Carter County, known by residents as Henderson Flats, was secured for the base location. Twenty-one individual tenants, some of whom were borrowers from the Farm Security Administration, were farming the 2,000-plus-acre area. The Farm Security Administration's Resettlement Program was providing several 40-acre farms for down-and-out farmers on 650 acres of government owned land in the area. This land also became part of the base. Following a bitter time of protest, the farmers had to give up the land. Their homes, barns and fences were dozed or moved elsewhere and the land made level. Not a pleasant time for the farmers or government officials but the lawyers were grinning.

The Ardmore Army Air Field was activated August 3, 1942. The base entrance is a mile north of Gene Autry, Oklahoma, formerly known as Berwyn. Berwyn was a Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory community founded before statehood in 1888. The town, by petition of its citizens to honor a well-known newcomer, was renamed Gene Autry, November 16, 1941, before work on the base was begun.

The Name Change

Gene Autry, the popular western actor, entertainer, and star of the "Melody Ranch" radio program, leased 1,200 acres of land in 1938 a few miles west of Berwyn. He purchased the "Old Berwyn Ranch" as it was known, August 12, 1941, and renamed it the Flying "A" Ranch. He probably had plans for spending time at the Flying "A" but time was in short supply. He was a busy man that starred in movies, made recordings, and was the featured entertainer at most of his Flying "A" Ranch Rodeos. He kept the Flying "A" Rodeo stock at the ranch. That, plus the fact that it was centrally located in the US, was probably the principle reason for buying it. It might have been the retirement home of Champion, his famous horse. However, the war was an interruption and his plans were changed.

He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in July, was inducted at the Chicago Induction Center and reported to Bolling Field, Washington, DC, August 1, 1942. Sergeant Autry visited the Ardmore base to view construction with several Ardmore businessmen and the base commander in early November 1942. He had ridden in the Armistice Day parade at Stillwater, Oklahoma and was being flown to Ft. Worth, Texas by pioneer Ardmore pilot, Arthur "Art" Oakley. Autry was stationed at Luke Field, Glendale, Arizona at that time.

The Flying "A" Ranch changed title ownership in March of 1946. Autry spent very little time after the war on the ranch or in his namesake town. He performed at the rodeo in Ardmore in 1949 and 1957 and might have visited both while in the area. An Autry acquaintance related that Autry came through Gene Autry in 1991 when he was in Oklahoma to be inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. As far as is known, his limousine did not stop. In 1992, prior to Autry's death in 1998, a museum was established in Gene Autry by a local citizen to honor Mr. Autry's achievements. It also preserves the memory of the other singing cowboys of the B-class western movies of the 1940s. The younger generation will remember Mr. Autry as owner, then co-owner, of the California Angels baseball team, the 2002 World's Series winner, now known as the Los Angeles Angels. Mr. Autry would have been proud!

Gene Autry, the town, changed little through the years in spite of the close proximity of the base. Land owners near the base and town apparently had no interest in housing developments in spite of the need during both periods of base activity. Census records for 1940 indicate 227 residents. By 2000, the number was 99 158 in 2010. The school was closed many years ago and is now the Gene Autry Oklahoma Museum.

Remember The Day of Infamy
And 9/11
Do Not Forget.

The First Time Around---World War II

The base carried the name of Ardmore, the nearest town of size, 16,886 population in 1940 23,711 in 2000 and 24,283 in 2010. Ardmore is county seat of Carter County and is situated approximately ten air miles southwest of the base. Some during that period, and even now, referred to it as the Gene Autry Base.

In 1940, Ardmore's Chamber of Commerce, like many US cities, was interested in securing a defense oriented entity to boost the economy of the area. Potential proposals included a munitions factory, a navy base at nearby Lake Murray, a marine training base, an air corps flying field and several other imaginative possibilities. All were submitted to the proper governmental authority. The army air field seemed to have potential, especially as a glider training base.

A committee of Ardmoreites and military personnel was formed in 1941, prior to Pearl Harbor, to select a site for an army air corps training base. The committee first considered a site near Lone Grove, Oklahoma, a small community approximately seven miles west of Ardmore. The large area of flat land north of Lone Grove would have seemed to be ideal for an airfield. That possibility was quickly dismissed in favor of the Gene Autry location which was recommended to the military for consideration. The deciding factor for location might have been the availability of the 650 acres of government land near Gene Autry. The military approved the committee's proposal if the land could be bought and leased to the government within a short period of time. Within two months, Ardmore citizens approved a $100,000 bond issue, 44 to 1, to finance the purchase of the land (1416.28 acres). The government contributed the other 650 acres it already owned in the area. The committee learned from congressional representatives, April 22, 1942, that the base was coming to Gene Autry. The land was leased to the government for the duration of the war plus six-months for one dollar. The large, flat area would allow for long runways, the longest 7200' x 150', suitable for all aircraft of that period. That remains true for most of today's aircraft. The area was an adequate distance from large population areas.

The initial plans were that the base would serve as a glider training facility. The Arbuckle Mountains located to the north and east of the base would have been ideal for creating updrafts and down drafts. But plans, purposes and commands change, and did several times, before the base was completed. Fast Forward Note: The NASA Space Program used our highest form of glider, the space shuttle. The tragic destruction of "Columbia," February 1, 2003, reminds us anew of the uncontrollable nature of a heavy aircraft without power. Our deepest sympathy to the loved ones of the crew.

The first commander of the base, Lt. Colonel James M. Walker, set up Headquarters in Ardmore, August 9, 1942, in the Wirt Franklin Building. An Infantry officer and decorated WWI veteran with an engineering degree, he came to Ardmore from Camp San Luis Obispo, California. Busy with planning and work on the base, US Army Engineers from Denison, Texas under command of Captain D. U. Gray, already had offices there. Walker supervised construction of the field from there until quarters could be established on the field, September 15, 1942. The first ten enlisted men arrived from Stout Field, Indianapolis, Indiana in September. They lived with three Ardmore families until quarters were finished at the base. As construction progressed, additional officers and enlisted men were assigned to the field. Lt. Colonel Charles R. Blake assumed command, October 15, 1942.

The first group of soldiers to arrive were under command of the First Troop Carrier Command of Indianapolis, Indiana (Stout Field, Glider and Troop Transport). On November 21, 1942, the 418th Headquarters and Air Base Squadron arrived. This contingency consisted of 262 enlisted men, 13 officers assigned, plus 30 enlisted men and four officers attached.

In the following weeks and into early 1943, approximately 200 glider pilots were assigned to the field along with 15 liaison aircraft (L3-C Aeronca and L2-A Taylorcraft) for use in training. At the time of the glider pilots arrival, individually or in small groups, only four base officers were qualified as pilots. These included Lt. Colonel Boyd R. Ertwine, Base Commander as of February 3, 1943, Captain A. H. White, Base Operations Officer, Captain John T. Snyder, Base Technical Inspector and Lt. Warren C. Wood, Assistant Base Operations Officer. One of these officers would fly with a glider pilot (Flight Officer) whom they had selected based on his previous military and civilian flying experience. Those who passed the test were certified as check pilots to give transitional training to the other glider pilots. No flight could be made unless one of the two occupants was a check pilot. A CG-4A glider was brought to the field from Detroit, Michigan but reports indicate it saw limited use while at the base. Glider pilot training never materialized on a large scale or for very long. The glider pilots, most of whom had civilian licenses or had been in military flight training, usually trained in the first phase of glider instruction with light aircraft that could glide for long distances with reduced power or with engines turned off. Advanced phases included the use of "two-place" sail planes and the large CG-4A glider.

Ardmore Army Air Field was transferred from the Second Air Force to the command of the Third Air Force on April 12, 1943. Shortly thereafter, on April 15, 1943, several hundred men from both groups of glider personnel that had been at the base for a short time were transferred to Bowman Field, Louisville, Kentucky or commands elsewhere.

History will not record Ardmore Army Air Field as a strong contributor to the proud history of the glider pilots but many who were at Ardmore later played a vital part in key operations wherever troops and supplies were needed.

Following the theme, base commanders also began a succession of change. Lt. Colonel Boyd R. Ertwine, former CO of the 10th Troop Carrier Group, Pope Field, North Carolina, replaced Blake, February 3, 1943. He opened the base to visits by civilians, April 6, 1943 (National Army Day). In spite of high winds and dust, an estimated crowd of 8,000 had their first chance to view selected buildings and non-restricted sections on the unfinished base. Ertwine's command ended, July 19, 1943, when he was replaced by Lt. Colonel Frank J. Siebenaler. Ertwine was a popular commander with citizens after acquainting them with base activities. He was transferred to Congaree Army Air Field, Columbia, South Carolina.

In June 1943, Ardmore Army Air Field became a sub-base of Will Rogers Field along with three other Oklahoma fields and one Kansas field. Will Rogers Field, located at Oklahoma City, changed to base status.


394th Inspection at MacDill Field

The Ardmore facility was designated, July 12, 1943, as a Martin "Marauder" B-26 Crew Training Base. The 394th Bombardment Group's four squadrons, the 584th, (Captain Kenneth T. Wilhite, Squadron Commander) 585th, (Captain Edward B. Saxon) 586th, (Captain Joseph M. Silk) and 587th, (Captain Robert E. Keating), under command of Lt. Colonel Thomas B. Hall, were here during a brief period of five weeks before they were transferred, August 19, 1943, to Kellogg Field, Battle Creek, Michigan. They had previously been stationed at MacDill Field, Tampa, Florida since activation, March 3, 1943, and were involved with Phase Two crew training while at Ardmore. This involved local and distant training flights with simulated missions allowing all crew members to practice and improve their skills. Classroom instruction was also part of the program. At this time, no gunnery or bombing ranges were associated with the Ardmore field. It is reported that the 394th used a bombing range located in the Great Salt Plains area of northern Oklahoma as did other training units. The outlines of a German battleship, the Scharnhorst, and an oil refinery were used as simulated targets.

  • Air Base Group: Headquarters, Communications, Air Police, Air Installations and Food Service Squadrons
  • Maintenance and Supply Group: Maintenance, Supply and Vehicle Squadrons
  • Hospital Group: 4454 USAF Hospital and Tactical Infirmary
  • Detachment 1: 3rd Aerial Port Squadron
  • Detachment 11: 25th Weather Squadron

Making It Happen 1942-461953-59

This I Remember.

A Small-World, God-Directed, Get-Together

A Story Of Survival

In Memory Of

We have linked to a few sites and pictures that will help all of us remember the planes, the people, and a time of citizen super-patriots.

Waco CG4A Cargo/Troop Glider
Cockpit of B-17 "909" by Tony Mannine
Fairchild C-119 "Flying Boxcar"-Instrument Panel
Martin B-26 "Marauder"-Instrument Panel
Fairchild C-123 "Provider"-Instrument Panel
Chase YC-122-Instrument Panel
AT-11(C-45)-Instrument Panel
Taylorcraft L-2 "Grasshopper"-Instrument Panel
Aeronca L-3 "Grasshopper"-Instrument Panel
Cockpit of Lockheed C-130A,130J, "Hercules"
Instrument Panel Lockheed P-38J
The PlaneThat Wouldn't Quit!
Jacket, Flying, Type A-2
Ardmore Army Air Field/Ardmore Air Force Base, 1943,1956
Still ServingThe Commander
The Weekly Voice Of The Field (WWII-Korean Conflict)
Inside One Ardmore Army Air Field Mess Hall and Thanksgiving Menu, 1943
Ardmore Air Force Base, Thanksgiving and Christmas Menus, 1956
B-17 Training Film Used In Pilot Training
More About The B-17 From The Pilot's Manual
The End Of The Day, Ardmore Army Air Field, 1943
Medical Detachment, Base Hospital, 1943
A List Of Former And Present Air Fields and Bases
A Source for Military Aviation Incident Reports
Kilroy was Here!
Remembrance Memorial Blog
Flight Jacket Emblem, 222nd Combat Crew Training School
Ardmore Air Force Base, 1959, After Deactivation
Base Yearbooks, 1944/1955
Condensed Base Historical Summary, 1942-46, 1953-59
Military Memorial Museum, Ardmore
If you, or a relative, served at Ardmore at either activation period and can furnish additional information, have pictures of the base or of men who are listed in the "In Memory Of" page---please make an e-mail contact. It is important that we eventually have pictures of each of the men who died in training. Please help this happen! Information about base units (either activation period) or aircraft accidents will be especially appreciated---or if you just want to comment on the webpage, e-mail to gsimmons

Click on map for Aeronautical Charts of Ardmore area and US.

Time Around The World Please Note: We believe the information on these pages is factual but will understandably need fine-tuning as additional data becomes available. If you notice something that you feel is inaccurate, please contact by e-mail as we want the information to be correct. The passing of time sometimes promotes error because those who know for sure are no longer around. The material within this document has been obtained from newspapers, City of Ardmore publications, Military Memorial Museum (Ardmore), Chickasaw Regional Library System, Ardmore Public Library, AFHRA/RSA accident reports and verbal accounts of veterans and locals. The majority of information about the 394th Bombardment Group was obtained from "Bridge Busters". Graphics used are thought to be public domain items. If this is not the case, copyright items will be removed when notified or will be used with permission of the owner. Please excuse the poor quality of micro-film newspaper scans.


Units

The 419th Fighter Wing is divided into three subordinate groups which supervise nine squadrons and four flights. Additionally, the wing oversees a medical squadron that reports directly to the commander. Several staff agencies such as plans, safety, quality, financial management, public affairs and the legal office form the wing commander’s headquarters section staff.

  • The 419th Operations Group plans and organizes operational programs and establishes policies and procedures for operational training functions. It directs, monitors and supports operations programs, including flight operations, standardization/evaluation, weapons and tactics, intelligence, operations and training and life support. The wing’s designated flying squadron is the 466th Fighter Squadron. Pilots from the unit train for both air-to-air and air-to-ground attack missions in the F-16 C/D model aircraft.
  • The 419th Maintenance Group plans, organizes and establishes programs, policies and procedures in support of the unit’s flying missions and contingency operations. Subordinate units include the 419th Maintenance Squadron, the 419th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, and 419th Maintenance Operations Flight. These units train personnel, provide required resources at home and deployed locations, and maintain the wing’s aircraft. The 419th Combat Logistics Support Squadron also falls under the Maintenance Group. Its wartime mission is to deploy teams worldwide to accomplish rapid Aircraft Battle Damage Repair and packing operations.
  • The 419th Mission Support Group provides non-tactical support for the operational mission of the 419th Fighter Wing. It provides programs and support to the Security Forces, Communications, Civil Engineer and Mission Support Squadrons. The 419th Security Forces Squadron provides resource protection, system security and base defense missions. The 419th Civil Engineer Squadron provides pre-attack and post-attack civil engineering support necessary to maintain aircraft operations. The 419th Mission Support Flight provides administrative support for the operational mission of the wing. The 419th Logistics Readiness Squadron is responsible for managing personnel and materiel resources. The 67th Aerial Port Squadron also falls under the Mission Support Group. Its members load and unload air freight arriving from and departing for points worldwide.

The 419th Fighter Wing is divided into three subordinate groups which supervise nine squadrons and four flights. Additionally, the wing oversees a medical squadron that reports directly to the commander. Several staff agencies such as plans, safety, quality, financial management, public affairs and the legal office form the wing commander’s headquarters section staff.

The 419th Operations Group plans and organizes operational programs and establishes policies and procedures for operational training functions. It directs, monitors and supports operations programs, including flight operations, standardization/evaluation, weapons and tactics, intelligence, operations and training and life support. The wing’s designated flying squadron is the 466th Fighter Squadron. Pilots from the unit train for both air-to-air and air-to-ground attack missions in the F-16 C/D model aircraft.

The 419th Maintenance Group plans, organizes and establishes programs, policies and procedures in support of the unit’s flying missions and contingency operations. Subordinate units include the 419th Maintenance Squadron, the 419th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, and 419th Maintenance Operations Flight. These units train personnel, provide required resources at home and deployed locations, and maintain the wing’s aircraft. The 419th Combat Logistics Support Squadron also falls under the Maintenance Group. Its wartime mission is to deploy teams worldwide to accomplish rapid Aircraft Battle Damage Repair and packing operations.

The 419th Mission Support Group provides non-tactical support for the operational mission of the 419th Fighter Wing. It provides programs and support to the Security Forces, Communications, Civil Engineer and Mission Support Squadrons. The 419th Security Forces Squadron provides resource protection, system security and base defense missions. The 419th Civil Engineer Squadron provides pre-attack and post-attack civil engineering support necessary to maintain aircraft operations. The 419th Mission Support Flight provides administrative support for the operational mission of the wing. The 419th Logistics Readiness Squadron is responsible for managing personnel and materiel resources. The 67th Aerial Port Squadron also falls under the Mission Support Group. Its members load and unload air freight arriving from and departing for points worldwide.


22d Troop Carrier Squadron

Tachikawa, the squadron was redesignated the 22d Troop Carrier Squadron Heavy. When the Korean War broke out in June 1950, the squadron flew thousands
782 d Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. The squadron was first activated in 1943 as the 782 d Bombardment Squadron It
The 33 d Troop Carrier Squadron is an active United States Air Force unit, redesignated as the Air Mobility Command Test and Evaluation Squadron It is
The 302 d Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. Its last assignment was with the 441st Troop Carrier Group, based at Chicago - Orchard
predecessor of the squadron was organized in 1940 as the 13th Transport Squadron During World War II, as the 13th Troop Carrier Squadron the squadron served in
The 2nd Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 65th Troop Carrier Group. It was inactivated at
January 1945 to mid - February 1946 the 419th Troop Carrier Group s headquarters was assigned neither squadrons nor aircraft, but was composed primarily of
The 902 d Troop Carrier Group is an inactive United States Air Force Reserve unit. It was last active with the 94th Troop Carrier Wing at Grenier Air Force
Carrier Squadron 8C 1 August 1943 15 February 1946 301st Troop Carrier Squadron Z4 1 August 1943 18 May 1945 302 d Troop Carrier Squadron 2L

Reconnaissance Squadron on 26 May 1952 Activated in the reserve on 14 June 1952 Inactivated on 18 May 1955 Redesignated 733 d Troop Carrier Squadron Medium
constituted as the 73rd Troop Carrier Squadron the unit received a Distinguished Unit Citation and a French Croix de Guerre with Palm for its D - Day missions in
The 69th Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last active with the 916th Troop Carrier Group, based at Carswell
The 70th Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 433 d Troop Carrier Group, based at Cleveland Municipal
The 316th Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive unit of the United States Air Force. Its last assignment was with the 436th Troop Carrier Group, stationed
Base, Florida. Originally formed in June 1943 as the 93 d Troop Carrier Squadron the squadron participated on the Western Front flying Douglas C - 47 Skytrains
The 81st Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. Its last assignment was with the 436th Troop Carrier Group, based at Grenier
Returned to the United States in August 1945, becoming a domestic troop carrier squadron for Continental Air Forces, inactivated July 1946. For its perseverance

  • Tachikawa, the squadron was redesignated the 22d Troop Carrier Squadron Heavy. When the Korean War broke out in June 1950, the squadron flew thousands
  • 782 d Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. The squadron was first activated in 1943 as the 782 d Bombardment Squadron It
  • The 33 d Troop Carrier Squadron is an active United States Air Force unit, redesignated as the Air Mobility Command Test and Evaluation Squadron It is
  • The 302 d Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. Its last assignment was with the 441st Troop Carrier Group, based at Chicago - Orchard
  • predecessor of the squadron was organized in 1940 as the 13th Transport Squadron During World War II, as the 13th Troop Carrier Squadron the squadron served in
  • The 2nd Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 65th Troop Carrier Group. It was inactivated at
  • January 1945 to mid - February 1946 the 419th Troop Carrier Group s headquarters was assigned neither squadrons nor aircraft, but was composed primarily of
  • The 902 d Troop Carrier Group is an inactive United States Air Force Reserve unit. It was last active with the 94th Troop Carrier Wing at Grenier Air Force
  • Carrier Squadron 8C 1 August 1943 15 February 1946 301st Troop Carrier Squadron Z4 1 August 1943 18 May 1945 302 d Troop Carrier Squadron 2L
  • airlift and airdrop operations. The squadron was first activated in June 1942 as the 53 d Troop Carrier Squadron After training in the United States
  • The 64th Air Refueling Squadron is a United States Air Force air - refueling squadron assigned to the 22d Operations Group at McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas
  • 442 d Troop Carrier Group: 30 March 1944 20 May 1945 Squadrons 1st Troop Carrier Pathfinder Squadron Provisional 19 26 May 1945 2 d Troop Carrier Pathfinder
  • The 67th Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 433 d Troop Carrier Group, based at Rhein - Main
  • The 52 d Troop Carrier Wing 52 TCW is a disbanded unit of the United States Air Force. It was last assigned to the New York Air National Guard NY ANG
  • The 22d Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron 22 AES was a unit of the United States Air Force. It was created in 1957 in South Carolina, and inactivated
  • The 75th Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 316th Troop Carrier Group at Ashiya Air Base
  • August 1950 January 1951 46th Troop Carrier Squadron P 47th Troop Carrier Squadron P 48th Troop Carrier Squadron P 1st TCG was organized at Ashiya
  • The 66th Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive unit of the United States Air Force. Its last assignment was with the 403 d Troop Carrier Group, stationed
  • well as distinguished visitor missions. Constituted as the 65th Troop Carrier Squadron on 7 December 1942 Activated on 12 December 1942 Inactivated on
  • Wing. Constituted 2 d Combat Cargo Squadron on 11 April 1944 Activated on 15 April 1944 Redesignated 327th Troop Carrier Squadron on 31 October 1945 Inactivated
  • The 49th Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. Its last assignment was with the 313th Troop Carrier Group at Camp Myles Standish
  • War II troop carrier squadron that served in the China Burma India Theater as an airlift unit. Its last assignment was with the 443 d Troop Carrier Group
  • Reconnaissance Squadron on 26 May 1952 Activated in the reserve on 14 June 1952 Inactivated on 18 May 1955 Redesignated 733 d Troop Carrier Squadron Medium
  • constituted as the 73rd Troop Carrier Squadron the unit received a Distinguished Unit Citation and a French Croix de Guerre with Palm for its D - Day missions in
  • The 69th Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last active with the 916th Troop Carrier Group, based at Carswell
  • The 70th Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 433 d Troop Carrier Group, based at Cleveland Municipal
  • The 316th Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive unit of the United States Air Force. Its last assignment was with the 436th Troop Carrier Group, stationed
  • Base, Florida. Originally formed in June 1943 as the 93 d Troop Carrier Squadron the squadron participated on the Western Front flying Douglas C - 47 Skytrains
  • The 81st Troop Carrier Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. Its last assignment was with the 436th Troop Carrier Group, based at Grenier
  • Returned to the United States in August 1945, becoming a domestic troop carrier squadron for Continental Air Forces, inactivated July 1946. For its perseverance

Major General Kenneth T. Bibb, Jr. Belleville, IL.

Commander, 22d Airlift Squadron, and Deputy Group Commander, 60th Operations Group, Travis Air Force Base. California and Chief, Complaints Resolution. 374th Troop Carrier Group WWII World War II Army Air Forces. Unit: 22ND TROOP CARRIER SQUADRON. Service or Relationship: Family Member. Comments: I am looking for a man wh went by the name Digger Brutzman. Theater Airlift Management and Control. IX Troop Carrier Command: HQ 438th Troop Carrier Group and the 87th, 88th, 89th and The 19th Bombardment Squadron Heavy, 22d Bombardment Group​.

Tactical Airlift.

Marine Helicopter Transport Squadron HMR 261, the Raging Bulls, was The squadron disembarked the 22D MEU and all ACE aircraft, personnel and. 65 troop rlc Charlton Heston Academy. Forces through airlift, aerial refueling and 1997 Squadron Officer School, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. 1999, C 5 Flight Examiner and Group Executive Officer, 22d Airlift Squadron, Travis Evaluation, 56th Airlift Squadron, Altus AFB, Okla.

Branch Accounts Air Force Korean War Educator.

At the beginning of the Korean War, the Air Forces only tactical control group was 21st Troop Carrier Sqdn 22nd Troop Carrier Sqdn 34th Troop Carrier Sqdn. 22nd Airlift Squadron Glob. Redesignated 22nd Troop Carrier Squadron, Heavy, 21 May 1948. Redesignated 22nd Military Airlift Squadron, 8 Jan 1966. Inactivated, 8 Jun. TRAVIS AIR FORCE BASE CALIFORNIA. The 22nd Airlift Squadron Patch is displayed June 25, 2019 at Travis Air Force Base, California. The 22nd AS is part of the 60th Air Mobility. Readiness in a Downdraft Air Force Magazine. The 21st and 22nd Airlift Squadrons honored 75 years of global mobility with a combined anniversary celebration March 30 to April 1 at Travis Air Force Base,.

Images 22nd Airlift Squadron Patch DVIDS.

22d Airlift Squadron, Travis Air Force Base, California. 574 likes. Government Organization. 22nd Military Airlift Squadron Air Mobility Command Museum. Air Force had only the 21st and 22nd Troop Carrier Squadrons cobbled together from crews and assorted worn out aircraft that happened to be in theater when. 22d Airlift Squadron Change of Command YouTube. 22d: 1942 1946 1946. 33d: 1942 1946. Stations. Brisbane, Australia, 12 Nov 1942 Port Moresby, New Guinea, Dec 1942 Townsville, Australia,. USAAF Chronology:. Aircraft was transferred to the 315th Troop Carrier Group, which reported to Seventh 104 Briefing by Commander, 22d Military Airlift Squadron, to MAC Wing.

22nd Troop Carrier Squadron 5th AAF two theater made patches.

Served in this Air Squadron? Find People you served with from 22nd Troop Carrier Squadron. Join TWS for Free Today!. 22d Airlift Squadron Home Facebook. 22d Bomb Group. 22cl Portable Surgical Hospital. tillery 2nd Military Police Platoon. 24th Counter 54th Troop Carrier Wing, EIendquarters nml IImtlqunrters. Airlift Doctrine Air University. Following the return of the 22d Bombardment Group from Korea, the wing The 452nd Troop Carrier Wing was activated at March in 1960,.

Kristina Eash Unit Program Coordinator 22d Airlift Squadron.

2007 10 15 Ndunruh 1116×1155× 333293 bytes The crest seal of the 22d Airlift Squadron. Licensing Source: Travis AFB Public. Loren A. Kavage Obituary Visitation & Funeral Information. Custom patches for the 22nd Airlift Squadron at Travis Air Force Base. Our 22 AS patches are 100% embroidered with Velcro backing.

22d Airlift Squadron Travis AFB, CA Foursquare.

Nang, to support the 2nd Advanced Echelon 2d ADVON, the Air Force aircraft was transferred to the 315th Troop Carrier Group, which reported to Seventh. AIR TRANSPORT UNITS CBI Unit Lineages and History. Опубликовано: 30 мая 2020 г. Air Force 22nd Troop Carrier Squadron USAF Veteran Locator. United States Air Force 22nd Airlift Squadron Over The Hump Travis AFB Air Mobility Command Challenge Coin VMeasures approx 1 2 inches The 22d Airlift. Troop Carrier Sam McGowan. The 22nd Airlift Squadron, sometimes written as 22d Airlift Squadron, is part of the 60th Air Mobility Wing at Travis Air Force Base, California. It operates C 5M. WW2 Army Air Corps Air Force Unit Records Research WW2. The present 54th Troop Carrier Squadron was ac tivated at Awe, Charles., r., 2nd Street, Upper Lake, California. Babcock, Edward C., 2511.



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