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Rupertus DD-851 - History

Rupertus DD-851 - History


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Rupertus DD-851

Rupertus(DD-851: dp. 3 540 (f.), 1. 391', b. 41', dr. 19', s. 35 k., cpl. 376; a. 6 5", i6 40mm., 14 20mm., 2 dct., 6 dcp., 5 21" tt.;cl. Gearing)Rupertus (DD-851) was laid down 2 May 1945 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass.; launched 21 September 1945; sponsored by Mrs. William H. Rupertus, and commissioned 8 March 1946 Comdr. William C. F. Robards in command.Following sLakedown off Guantanamo Bay and visits to various east coast ports, Rupertus transited the Panama Canal and steamed to San Francisco. Since 1946 she has alternated deployments to the western Pacific with operations off the west coast of the United States.On her first deployment in 1947 she operated throughout the Far East, but particularly at Tsingtao, China. In the eastern Pacific throughout 1948, she returned to Tsingtao in 1949 only to be one of the last three Ameriean ships to leave that port before it fell to the Communists.Returning to San Diego in December for operations in the eastern Pacific and overhaul, she departed San Diego 13 November 1950 to operate with U.N. forces off Korea. She escorted carrier Sicily from Sasebo to Hungnam, Korea, then from 14 May 1951, operated with blockade and escort TF 95 off the west coast of Korea and in the Yellow Sea. Leaving TF 95 and steaming to Wonsan, Rupertus spent 10 days off the coast near Songju and fired thousands of rounds of ammunition at shore targets. Rupertus saw continuous combat service until 4 July 1951, when she returned to Inehon during the armistice talks.Returning to San Diego 8 August 1951, Rupertus steamed out again to rejoin the 7th Fleet 23 February 1952. Operating first with carrier TF 77, she then departed to bombard the Hungnam-Hannum area with Manchester and rescued a pilot from Bo~er while under heavy Communist shore battery fire. Rupertus put in to the Long Beach Naval Shipyard for overhaul on 6 October.Departing San Diego for the western Pacific again 16 May 1953, Rupertus screened Bremerton (CA-130) in TF 77, participated in shore bombardment missions off Korea, conducted hunter-killer exercises, trained Chinese Nationalist naval students in Formosan waters, and participated in the centennial celebration of Commodore M. C. Perry's first visit to Japan, before returning to San Diego.After the Korean truce, Rupertus continued her annual deployments to WestPae until 1960 when she was assigned Yokosuka as a homeport. In WestPac for almost 3 consecutive years, she operated off Vietnam during the Communist advance there in April 1961.Rupertus returned to San Francisco 13 December 1962, and following a FRAM I overhaul, which replaced her World War II armament with a modern integrated ASW weapons system including ASROC and DASH, she entered her temporary homeport of Long Beach, Calif. On 26 May 1964 she again steamed for Yokosuka, Taiwan Patrol and after the August Tonkin Gulf incident, the South China Sea. Remaining in the Far East, in June 1965 she nartieipated in operations supporting the Gemini IV space flight, then returned to Vietnamese waters for "Market Time" operations boarding and inspecting many boats and ships off South Vietnam in search of Communist contraband; and provided naval gunfire support to U.S. forces in Vietnam. Operations on Taiwan Patrol and in the South China Sea continued throughout 1966, interrupted by participation in GT-9A recovery operations in May and June.Rupertus, again homeported at Long Beach, arrived there 3 August 1966. A year later she sailed for the Far East again arriving on Yankee Station in the Gulf of Tonkin in July. With Forrestal (CVA-59) when a series of explosions temporarily disabled the giant carrier on 29 July, Rupertus maneuvered to within 20 feet of the crippled ship and remained alongside for a period of 3 hours assisting in fighting fires, cooling magazines, and rescuing personnel thrown into the sea. Rupertus then participated in "Sea Dragon" operations involving the interdiction of waterborne logistics craft staging from North Vietnamese ports, and drew enemy fire off Dong Hoi, North Vietnam, which resulted in minor shrapnel hits. Assigned to gunfire support off South Vietnam in October, she returned to Long Beach on 4 December.Following overhaul and exercises off the California ooast, Rupertus again got underway for WestPae on 3 July 1968. She arrived in her new homeport, Yokosuka, 22 July, and assumed naval gunfire support responsibilities off South Vietnam on 14 August. Taking up "Sea Dragon" duties on 29 August, she again eame under fire from enemy coastal defense sites. After serving as part of the Apollo 7 recovery team, she returned to duties off Vietnam and then plane guard duty off Korea, winding up 1968 in Yokosuka.Continuing to operate throughout the Far East during 1969, part of that time off Vietnam, Rupertus returned to San Diego 15 August 1970. She remained in San Diego for the rest of 1q70, spending munh of the time in drydock.Both 1971 and 1972 brought Rupertus a WestPae oruise, each of about six months duration and alternated with operations in the San Diego area. Soon after her return from the second of these latest deployments, in the spring of 1973 she underwent an INSURV inspeotion which resulted in her being deolared unfit for further servioe. Rupertus was offered to the Hellenio Navy on a loan basis and she was decommissioned 10 July 1973. Concurrent with her decommissioning, she was transferred to the Hellenie Navy and recommissioned as Kountouriotis (D-213~.Rupertus earned seven battle stars for service in the Korean Confliect.


USS Rupertus DD 851 (1946-1973)

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Rupertus DD-851 - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

World War I veteran, Marine Corps General William H. Rupertus led several World War II offensives. The DD-851 was launched on 21 September 1945, the year of the general’s death, and commissioned on 8 March 1946. Her first two Far Eastern tours took her to Tsingtao, China, where in 1949 she, the MANCHESTER (CL-83), and DIACHENKO (APD-1123), were the last American ships to leave before the Communist takeover.

The RUPERTUS was back in the western Pacific in November 1950, with the carrier SICILY (CVE-118) off Hungnam, Korea. She and the FECHTELER (DD-870) then joined the United Nations blockade and escort Task Force 95 until June 1951, when the RUPERTUS spent ten days shelling enemy targets near Songjin with the LEONARD F. MASON (DD-852) and THOMPSON (DMS-38), which later was hit badly by shore batteries. During these operations, four of the RUPE’s company, Ensign Robbins, Seamen Barry and Ward, and Fireman Harps, towed Republic of Korea raiding parties within 2,000 yards of the beach in the motor whaleboat. The DD-851 next steamed with the LOS ANGELES (CA-135) to fire some 459 five-inch rounds covering U.N. forces north of the 38th parallel. Combat action continued until 4 July 1951, when she, the FECHTELER, and LOS ANGELES sailed to Inchon during the armistice talks.

She returned briefly to San Diego, and then was back off Korea in the spring of 1952 bombarding the Hungnam area with the MANCHESTER (CL-83). There, she sped through heavy fire from shore to rescue a downed pilot from the BOXER (CV-21). Following Taiwan Patrol duty and task force operations, she joined the BREMERTON (CA-130), JUNEAU (CLAA-119), and RICHARD B. ANDERSON (DD-786) for sea-air gun strikes against Korean coastal targets. In late August, the RUPERTUS and BREMERTON assisted in salvaging a tug sunk in Hungnam Harbor. Following overhaul at Long Beach, she returned in the summer of 1953 for shore bombardment missions, hunter-killer exercises off Japan, Korean coastal patrol, Chinese Nationalist naval student training cruises, and the centennial celebration of Commodore Perry’s first visit to Japan.

After the Korean truce, she continued annual deployments to the western Pacific, operating with the carriers RANGER (CVA-61), TICONDEROGA (CV-14), and CORAL SEA (CVA-43). In November 1960, she rescued a CORAL SEA airman blown overboard during flight operations. The following April, she was off Vietnam during the Communist advance. During 1961 and 1962, she served at various times with the MIDWAY (CVA-41), BON HOMME RICHARD (CVA-31), and LEXINGTON (CVA-16) as a unit of Destroyer Squadron 3, which included the HIGBEE (DD-806), ORLECK (DD-886), HENRY W. TUCKER (DDR-875), GEORGE K. MACKENZIE (DD-836), and LEONARD F. MASON. August 1962 found the RUPE’s crew assisting residents, during the eruption of a volcano on Miyake Jima off Honshu, Japan. That December, she returned to San Francisco for a FRAM I overhaul and installation of modern antisubmarine warfare weapons including ASROC and DASH systems.

As flagship of Destroyer Division 32, she headed for Yokosuka in May 1964 with the MACKENZIE and TUCKER. She began her tour on Taiwan patrol, and, after the August Tonkin Gulf incident, spent three months in the South China Sea. She participated in operations supporting the June 1965 Gemini IV space flight and then returned to South Vietnamese waters for Market Time operations, boarding and searching vessels from junks to ships for Communist contraband. Later, she and the MACKENZIE fired in support of the amphibious operation “Blue Marlin.”

Taiwan patrol and operations on Dixie Station in the South China Sea continued throughout 1966, interrupted by the GT-9A recovery mission in May and June and a return to Long Beach. She was with the FORRESTAL (CVA-59) on Yankee Station in the Tonkin Gulf on 29 July 1967 when explosions rocked the carrier and set it ablaze. Despite the danger, she maneuvered to within twenty feet of the crippled ship and remained alongside for three hours fighting fires, cooling magazines, and rescuing crew. She then began Sea Dragon operations to interdict North Vietnamese logistics craft. On 7 August 1967, she suffered minor shrapnel damage when shore batteries near Dong Hoi, North Vietnam, fired on her and the MACKENZIE. Later that month, she joined the TUCKER, BRUSH (DD-745), and DAVIDSON (DE-1045) in an unsuccessful two-day search for the crew of an RA-5C reconnaissance aircraft. In the fall, she and the MORTON (DD-948) supported I Corps area operations against the Viet Cong. She went on to complete over thirty-five Sea Dragon missions against North Vietnamese shore installations, troop concentrations, and water craft. The RUPE relieved the RICHARD S. EDWARDS (DD-950) in the I Corps area and by December was fighting heavy seas as she headed home with the CONSTELLATION (CVA-64) and MACKENZIE.

Following overhaul and exercises off the California coast, the RUPERTUS, was again in the Far East and by August 1968 was firing in support of Republic of Korea forces around Qui Nhon. At month’s end, she began Sea Dragon duties, dodging enemy fire as she joined the JOSEPH STRAUSS (DDG-16) in shelling coastal defense sites. After serving as part of the Apollo 7 recovery team, she relieved the JENKINS (DD-447) as the North Search and Rescue Gun Support Ship working with the FOX (DLG-33). In late November 1968, she participated in a special air demonstration with the HANCOCK (CV-19), MAHAN (DLG-11), DECATUR (DDG-31), and SAMUEL N. MOORE (DD-747).


Rupertus began his military career immediately after graduating high school, serving in the District of Columbia National Guard from 1907 to 1910. Originally, he intended to serve as a cutter captain in the United States Revenue Cutter Service, the earlier version of the modern U.S. Coast Guard. He was accepted to the U. S. Revenue Cutter School of Instruction on April 28, 1910. He graduated academically second in his class on May 15, 1913, but failed the physical examination. Because he was physically unqualified, he resigned from the U. S. Revenue Cutter Service on June 18, 1913. [1]

However, his excellent marksmanship led to his being recruited by the Marine Corps. He accepted a commission in November 1913, then attended the Marine Corps Officers School, graduating first in his class of 1915. Rupertus served on the Marine Corps rifle team, earning the Distinguished Marksman badge and winning a number of shooting matches.

Rupertus was serving aboard the battleship USS Florida when the United States entered World War I and was subsequently recalled up to the U.S. to command a detachment of Marines headed for Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Rupertus served in Haiti for three years until after the war, when he was sent to staff officer training and then made Inspector of Target Practice in the Operations and Training Division at Marine Corps Headquarters. In 1929 he commanded a detachment of the 4th Marines in Peking, China.

In July 1937, Rupertus was a battalion commander in the 4th Marines when the Japanese attacked Shanghai in the Second Sino-Japanese War.

During World War II, as commanding officer of the Marine barracks at San Diego, he wrote the Marine Corps Rifleman's Creed right after Pearl Harbor was bombed. He penned the Rifleman's Creed with the intent of encouraging expert marksmanship and Marines' trust in their weapons. In March 1942, he served as assistant division commander of the 1st Marine Division under Major General Alexander Vandegrift in New River, North Carolina to assist in the formation and training of the First Marine Division.

Rupertus commanded the Landing Task Force Organization which captured the islands of Tulagi, Gavutu and Tanambogo in the Guadalcanal campaign. After Vandegrift left the division in 1943, Rupertus took command. He led the 1st Marine Division during the Battle of Cape Gloucester and the Battle of Peleliu.

In November 1944, Major General Rupertus became the commandant of the Marine Corps Schools at Quantico, Virginia. His tenure was short, however, as he died of a heart attack on March 25, 1945, just four months later. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery. [2]

Major General Rupertus' decorations included:

In 1945, the U.S. Navy destroyer USS Rupertus (DD-851) was named in his honor. [3]

Rupertus also received the Faciat Georgius commemorative medal for service on Guadalcanal. [ citation needed ]

Navy Cross citation Edit

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Brigadier General William H. Rupertus (MCSN: 0-852), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service as Commander of a Landing Force Task Organization composed of the FIRST Raider Battalion, the Second Battalion, FIFTH Marines, and the FIRST Parachute Battalion, in action against enemy Japanese forces during the attack on the Solomon Islands, 7 to 9 August 1942. Despite the comparatively short time afforded him in which to organize his command, Brigadier General Rupertus quickly and efficiently assembled a provisional staff, and with their aid, his forces landed on Tulagi, Gavutu and Tanambogo, British Solomon Islands, and successfully assaulted a series of strategically disposed and strongly defended enemy positions. Personally conducting the operation and dauntlessly exposing himself to enemy fire whenever necessary, he displayed exceptional courage and cool determination which served as an inspiration to the officers and men of his command. His bold and judicious decisions and his high professional attainments contributed effectively to the success of our operations in the Tulagi Area and his conduct throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. [4]


Rupertus DD-851 - History

In case you don't have it, here is the official history of the Rupertus. As of my last contact with the Greek Naval authorities, the Rupertus, now renamed, is still being used by the Greek Navy, basically as a decoy. In 1976, the Naval History Division, Dept. of the Navy, published the "Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships." The Rupertus is described in Vol., VI, pages 171-2, as follows: Rupertus (DD 851) was laid down 2 May 1945 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy Mass.: launched 21 Sept. 1945 sponsored by Mrs. William H. Rupertus and commissioned 8 Mar. 1946, Comdr. William C. F. Robards in command. Following shakedown off Guantanamo Bay and visits to various east coast ports, Rupertus transited the Panama Canal and steamed to San Francisco.

Since 1946 she has alternated deployments to the western Pacific with operations off the West coast of the United States. On her first deployment in 1947 she operated throughout the Far East, but particularly at Tsingtao, China. In the eastern Pacific throughout 1948, she returned to Tsingtao in 1949 only to be one of the last three American ships to leave port before it fell to the Communists. Returning to San Diego in Dec. for operations in the eastern Pacific and overhaul, she departed San Diego 13 Nov. 1950 to operate with U. N. forces off Korea. She escorted carrier Sicily from Sasebo to Hungnmam, Korea then, from 14 May 1951, operated with blockade and escort TF 95 off the West coast of Korea and in the Yellow Sea. Leaving TF 95 and steaming to Wonsan, Rupertus spent 10 days off the coast near Songju and fired thousands of rounds of ammunition at shore targets. Rupertus saw continuous combat service until 4 July 1951, when she returned to Inchon during the armistice talks. Returning to San Diego 8 Aug. 1951, Rupertus steamed out again to rejoin the 7th Fleet 23 Feb. 1952. Operating first with carrier TF 77, she then departed to bombard the Hungnam-Hannum area with Manchester and rescued a pilot from Boxer while under heavy Communist shore battery fire. Rupertus put into Long Beach Naval Shipyard for overhaul on 6 Oct. Departing San Diego for the western Pacific again 16 May 1953, Rupertus screened Bremerton (CA-130) in TF 77, participated in shore bombardment missions off Korea, conducted hunter-killer exercises, trained Chinese Nationalist naval students in Formosan waters, and participated in the centennial celebration of Commodore M. C. Perry's first visit to Japan, before returning to San Diego.

After the Korean truce, Rupertus continued her annual deployments to WestPac until 1960 when she was assigned Yokosuka as a home port. In WestPac for almost three consecutive years, she operated off Vietnam during the Communist advance there in Apr. 1961. Rupertus returned to San Francisco 13 Dec. 1962, and following a FRAM I overhaul, which replaced her WW II armament with a modern integrated ASW weapons system including ASROC and DASH, she then entered her temporary home port of Long Beach, CA. On 26 May 1964 she again steamed for Yokosuka, Taiwan Patrol and after the Aug. Tonkin Gulf incident, the South China Sea. Remaining in the Far East, in Jun. 1965 she participated in operations supporting Gemini IV space flight then returned to Vietnam waters for "Market Time" operations, boarding and inspecting many boats and ships off South Vietnam in search of Communist contraband and provided naval gunfire support to U. S. forces in Vietnam. Operations on Taiwan Patrol and in the South China Sea continued throughout 1966, interrupted by participation in GT-9A recovery operations in May and June. Rupertus, again home ported at Long Beach, arrived there 3 Aug. 1966.

A year later she sailed for the Far East again, arriving Yankee Station in the Gulf of Tonkin in July. With Forrestal (CVA-59) when a series of explosions temporarily disabled the giant carrier on 29 July, Rupertus maneuvered to within 20 feet of the crippled ship and remained alongside for a period of three hours assisting in fighting fires, cooling magazines, and rescuing personnel thrown into the sea. Rupertus then participated in "Sea Dragon" operations involving the interdiction of waterborne logistics craft staging from North Vietnam ports, and drew enemy fire off Dong Hoi, North Vietnam, which resulted in minor shrapnel hits. Assigned to gunfire support off South Vietnam in Oct., she returned to Long Beach on 4 Dec.

Following overhaul and exercises off the Cal. Coast, Rupertus again got underway for WestPact on 3 July 1968. She arrived in her homeport, Yokosuka, 22 Jul., and assumed naval gunfire support responsibilities off South Vietnam on 14 Aug. Taking up "Sea Dragon" duties on 29 Aug., she again came under fire from enemy coastal defense sites. After serving as part of the Appollo 7 recovery team, she returned to duties off Vietnam and then plane guard duty off Korea, winding up 1968 in Yokosuka. Continuing to operate throughout the Far East during 1969, part of that time off Vietnam, Rupertus returned to San Diego 15 Aug. 1970. She remained in San Diego for the rest of 1970, spending much of the time in dry-dock. Both 1971 and 1972 brought Rupertus a WestPac cruise, each of about six months duration and alternated with operations in the San Diego area. Soon after her return from the second of these latest deployments, in the spring of 1973, she underwent an INSURV inspection which resulted in her being declared unfit for further service.

Rupertus was offered to the Hellenic Navy on a loan basis and she was decommissioned 10 Jul. 1973. Concurrent with her decommissioning, she was transferred to the Hellenic Navy and recommissioned a Kountouriotis (D-213). Rupertus earned seven battle stars for service in the Korean Conflict. The end.


Summary

This image is available from the Naval History and Heritage Command under the digital ID USN 1124775.
Most of the photos found in the NHHC collection are in the public domain and may be downloaded and used without permissions or special requirements. Those which are not will be noted in the copyright section of the NHHC image description.[1]
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https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/ PDM Creative Commons Public Domain Mark 1.0 false false


File:USS Rupertus (DD-851) stands by to assist the burning USS Forrestal (CVA-59), 29 July 1967 (USN 1124775).jpg

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USS BLACK DD666

Crewmen working over the ship's side chipping paint, while she was at the Naval Station, San Diego, California, in November 1968. Note ratguard on the mooring line at left.

Photographed by PHCS Herman Schroeder,USN.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph,
from the Collections of the Naval
Historical Center.

Underway during the early 1950s, probably soon after she was re-commissioned in July 1951. The ship is still essentially in her late War II configuration.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph,
from the Collections of the Naval
Historical Center.

Flagship of Commander Service Squadron THREE, with five Seventh Fleet destroyers alongside, circa 1962.

The destroyers are (from left to right):
USS Ernest G. Small (DDR-838)
USS Rupertus (DD-851)
USS Trathen (DD-530)
USS Cowell (DD-547) and
USS Black (DD-666).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph,
from the Collections of the
Naval Historical Center.

Refueling at sea from USS Eldorado(AGC-11), 14 November 1960.
Note boat cradles on Eldorado's deck, and life jackets worn by her crewmen.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph,
from the Collections of the
Naval Historical Center.

Insignia of USS Black (DD-666)
This emblem was used during World War II.


BAUSELL DD 845

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Gearing Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid 28 May 1945 - Launched 19 November 1945

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each name of the ship (for example, Bushnell AG-32 / Sumner AGS-5 are different names for the same ship so there should be one set of pages for Bushnell and one set for Sumner). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each name and/or commissioning period. Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.

Postmark Type
---
Killer Bar Text

Post Office Established 7 February 1946 - Disestablished 22 May 1978

Cachet by Frederick L. Karcher with a FRAUDULENT use of the "FREE" mail privilege.

Cachet by Frederick L. Karcher with a FRAUDULENT use of the "FREE" mail privilege.

Locy Type
2tnu
(USS,DD at top, 845 at bottom)

Other Information

USS BAUSELL earned the Combat Action Ribbon, the Meritorious Unit Commendation Ribbon w/ 1 Star, the Battle Efficiency "E" Ribbon, the China Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal W/ 1 Star, the Korean Service Medal w/ 3 Battle Stars, the United Nations Service Medal, the Republic Of Korea Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal w/ 9 Battle Stars and the Vietnam Campaign Medal W/ Clasp during her Naval career.

NAMESAKE - Corporal Lewis Kenneth Bausell, USMC (17 April 1924 - 18 August 1944)
         Bausell enlisted in the Marine Corps on 15 December 1941. After training at the Marine Corps' recruit depot at Parris Island, S.C., he joined the 1st Marine Division, at Camp Lejeune, N.C., on 29 January 1942. Bausell was promoted to Private First Class on 25 March, and to Corporal on 1 June. Assigned to take Peleliu, the 5th Marines sailed from Pavuvu in early September 1944. Landing at Beach "Orange One" on 15 September, Bausell’s regiment drew the task of seizing the island's airfield. Transported across the coral reef in LVTs, the Marines hit the beach and began fighting their way inland. Many small unmarked coral ridges bogged down the advance. Cpl. Bausell was in a squad assigned to neutralize a ridge honeycombed with many Japanese fortifications. The squad, led by 2nd Lt. Jack Kimble, was using a flamethrower to flush Japanese soldiers out the opposite side of a bunker where Cpl. Bausell and several other men were also firing into the fortification. A Japanese soldier appeared and threw a grenade among Bausell and the others. "There wasn't any cover and no place to run," related Kimble, "Bausell ran toward the grenade and fell upon it." Cpl. Bausell took the full blast of the explosion, sacrificing his own body to save his men. Severely wounded, he was evacuated and died of his wounds on August 18. For his conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty, Bausell was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. In addition to the Medal of Honor, Cpl Bausell was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart Medal, the Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with four bronze stars and the World War II Victory Medal.

The ships sponsor was Mrs. Lawrence K. Bausell, Corporal Bausell's mother.

If you have images or information to add to this page, then either contact the Curator or edit this page yourself and add it. See Editing Ship Pages for detailed information on editing this page.


Tiedosto:USS Rupertus (DD-851) stands by to assist the burning USS Forrestal (CVA-59), 29 July 1967 (USN 1124775).jpg

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