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This Day in History: 05/01/1931 - Empire State Building dedicated

This Day in History: 05/01/1931 - Empire State Building dedicated


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In This Day In History video clip - May 1, 1931: Empire State Building dedicated - At the White House in Washington, D.C., President Herbert Hoover pushes a button that turns on the lights of New York City's Empire State Building, officially opening the tallest building erected to that date. Standing 102 stories, or 1,454 feet from the top of its lightning rod to its base at 34th Street and Fifth Avenue below, the skyscraper became a world-famous symbol of American ambition and still dominates the Manhattan skyline.


Today in History: May 1

On May 1, 1707, the Kingdom of Great Britain was created as a treaty merging England and Scotland took effect.

An aerial view from Calton Hill in Edinburgh.

In 1931, New York’s 102-story Empire State Building was dedicated. Singer Kate Smith made her debut on CBS Radio on her 24th birthday. In 1941, the Orson Welles motion picture “Citizen Kane” premiered in New York.

Orson Welles takes the lead role in his film ‘Citizen Kane’, directed by himself for RKO. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

In 1967, Elvis Presley married Priscilla Beaulieu at the Aladdin Hotel in Las Vegas. (They divorced in 1973.)

Singer Elvis Presley and his bride, the former Priscilla Beaulieu, are shown at the Aladdin Hotel in Las Vegas, Nev., after their wedding on May 1, 1967. Presley, 32, and Beaulieu, 21, both from Memphis, Tenn., met while he was stationed in Germany with the U.S. Army. (AP Photo)

In 1975, Hank Aaron of the Milwaukee Brewers broke baseball’s all-time RBI record previously held by Babe Ruth during a game against the Detroit Tigers (Milwaukee won, 17-3).

Homerun king, Henry Aaron grins as a near record crowd gives him a standing ovation during opening day ceremonies before American League game against the Cleveland Indians at Milwaukee Stadium, Friday, April 11, 1975. More than 48,000 persons turned out to see Aaron and the Brewers at the season opener. (AP Photo/Paul Shane)

In 1992, on the third day of the Los Angeles riots, a visibly shaken Rodney King appeared in public to appeal for calm, pleading, “Can we all get along?”

This May 1, 1992 file photo shows Rodney King, right, speaking during a news conference in Los Angeles along with his attorney, Steven Lerman, left. King, the black motorist whose 1991 videotaped beating by Los Angeles police officers was the touchstone for one of the most destructive race riots in the nation’s history, died Sunday, June 17, 2012. He was 47. (AP Photo/David Longstreath, file)

In 2011, President Barack Obama announced the death of Osama bin Laden during a U.S. commando operation (because of the time difference, it was early May 2 in Pakistan, where the al-Qaida leader met his end).

President Barack Obama reads his statement to photographers after making a televised statement on the death of Osama bin Laden from the East Room of the White House in Washington, Sunday, May 1, 2011. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

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Today is Wednesday, May 1, the 121st day of 2019. There are 244 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On May 1, 1707, the Kingdom of Great Britain was created as a treaty merging England and Scotland took effect.

On this date:

In 1786, Mozart’s opera “The Marriage of Figaro” premiered in Vienna.

In 1931, New York’s 102-story Empire State Building was dedicated. Singer Kate Smith made her debut on CBS Radio on her 24th birthday.

In 1941, the Orson Welles motion picture “Citizen Kane” premiered in New York.

In 1945, a day after Adolf Hitler took his own life, Admiral Karl Doenitz effectively became sole leader of the Third Reich with the suicide of Hitler’s propaganda minister, Josef Goebbels.

In 1960, the Soviet Union shot down an American U-2 reconnaissance plane over Sverdlovsk and captured its pilot, Francis Gary Powers.

In 1964, the computer programming language BASIC (Beginner’s All-Purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) was created by Dartmouth College professors John G. Kemeny and Thomas E. Kurtz.

In 1967, Elvis Presley married Priscilla Beaulieu at the Aladdin Hotel in Las Vegas. (They divorced in 1973.) Anastasio Somoza Debayle became president of Nicaragua.

In 1971, the intercity passenger rail service Amtrak went into operation.

In 1975, Hank Aaron of the Milwaukee Brewers broke baseball’s all-time RBI record previously held by Babe Ruth during a game against the Detroit Tigers (Milwaukee won, 17-3).

In 1982, the World’s Fair in Knoxville, Tennessee, was opened by President Ronald Reagan.

In 1992, on the third day of the Los Angeles riots, a visibly shaken Rodney King appeared in public to appeal for calm, pleading, “Can we all get along?”

In 2011, President Barack Obama announced the death of Osama bin Laden during a U.S. commando operation (because of the time difference, it was early May 2 in Pakistan, where the al-Qaida leader met his end).

Ten years ago: Supreme Court Justice David Souter announced his retirement effective at the end of the court’s term in late June. (President Barack Obama chose federal judge Sonia Sotomayor to succeed him.) Singer-actor-impressionist Danny Gans, one of Las Vegas’ most popular entertainers, died at age 52.

Five years ago: Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called a 50-percent jump in reports by members of the military of sexual assaults the previous year a “clear threat” to both male and female service members’ lives and well-being, and said he’d ordered Pentagon officials to increase efforts to get male victims to report abuse.

One year ago: Entering the State Department headquarters for the first time as America’s top diplomat, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo vowed to reinvigorate American diplomacy and help the United States get “back our swagger.” Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein lashed out at Republican allies of President Donald Trump who had drafted articles of impeachment against Rosenstein, saying the Justice Department would not give in to threats.

Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.


May Day as Workers’ Day

On May 1, 1916, employees of the Puritan Underwear Company participated in the May Day worker’s parade in New York City. As captured in a photograph by the Bain News Service, a crowd of marchers parts for the camera to reveal a group of jaunty young women wearing pins and sashes while proudly hoisting a banner in the form of an oversized chemise, fastened with a Puritan pennant on its front. They may have also been on strike.

May Day 󈧔. Bain News Service, 1916. Bain Collection. Prints & Photographs Division

Members of the White Goods Workers, Local 62 of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union (ILGWU), these needle trade workers took part in an annual practice of May 1 workers’ parades initiated by U.S. labor organizations to commemorate a tragic set of events in 1886 Chicago while also celebrating worker solidarity. By 1890, May Day had become International Workers’ Day, which with time—and under various names including May Observance, Workers’ Day, or Labour Day—has turned into an annual holiday in countries around the world.

Known as the Haymarket Affair, the harrowing events of May, 1886, began with more than 400,000 Chicago workers joining a nationwide general strike for an 8-hour work day that, in Chicago External , escalated into strike-related clashes and loss of life. May 1 and May 2 saw peaceful protests, but May 3 brought picket line violence when police fired into a crowd. On May 4, a bomb tossed at police during a workers’ meeting in Haymarket Square led to further confrontation. The bomb blast and ensuing gunfire resulted in the deaths of eight police officers—mostly from friendly fire—and an unknown number of civilians. In the widely publicized legal proceedings that followed, eight anarchists were singled out and tried for murder on the basis of their political views rather than any evidence of their guilt in throwing the bomb. Four of the eight were convicted and executed by hanging, in November, 1887, while one committed suicide in prison the remaining three were eventually pardoned. Collectively, these men came to be known as the Haymarket Martyrs, with a monument erected to their memory in 1893.

Anarchists Monument in Waldheim Cemetery, Chicago. 1930. Stereograph Cards. Prints & Photographs Division

May Day as a holiday has its roots in celebrations of Spring going back at least to ancient Roman times, as well as in more recent European folk traditions such as bringing in the May in Britain and North America. Rituals including dancing ‘round the maypole saw revivals in popularity in the same years of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that the workers’ parades gained prominence. Over the course of the twentieth and now twenty-first centuries, May Day-specific workers’ celebrations have taken a variety of forms. In the U.S., May Day as worker’s day has been associated with social justice, and international, progressive causes. Paradoxically, May Day parades with their strong dissent-based roots were adopted as official ceremonies in countries such as the communist Soviet Union and its satellites, where they served to reinforce the nation-state’s homogeneous symbolic power rather than the people’s collective resistance. As one Smithsonian blog author writes, “Depending on your age, you might associate May 1 with dancing around a maypole in elementary school or watching tanks proceed through Moscow’s Red Square on the evening news.”

In 1955 at the height of McCarthyism, the U.S. Congress designated May 1 as Loyalty Day, to counter what was increasingly perceived as an annual communist-led protest (before that, Americanization Day had a similar goal). President Dwight Eisenhower issued a May 1 Loyalty Day proclamation as well. Since the late 1950s, each Congress and each President has continued the tradition, with presidents using their Loyalty Day proclamations External to address the concept of loyalty in remarkably varied ways. Despite the longstanding U.S. holiday of Labor Day on the first Monday in September, May Day has remained a focus of organized protest and dissent around the needs of the working classes, most recently for groups such as Occupy Wall Street and immigrants’ rights advocates.

To the Arm and Hammer, A Song for May Day … Joseph C. Borden, Jr… 1898. Printed Ephemera: Three Centuries of Broadsides and Other Printed Ephemera. Rare Book & Special Collections Division


This Day In History: May 1st

1308: King Albert was murdered by his nephew John, because he refused his share of the Habsburg lands.

1486: Christopher Columbus convinced Queen Isabella to fund an expedition to the West Indies.

1707: England, Wales and Scotland were united to form Great Britain.

1751: America&rsquos first cricket tournament was held in New York City.

1805: The state of Virginia passed a law requiring all freed slaves to leave the state, or risk either imprisonment or deportation.

1863: In Virginia, the Battle of Chancellorsville began. General Robert E. Lee's forces began fighting with Union troops under General Joseph Hooker. Confederate General Stonewall Jackson was mortally wounded by his own soldiers in this battle. (May 1-4)

1867: Reconstruction in the South began with black voter registration.

1877: U.S. President Rutherford B. Hayes withdrew all Federal troops from the South, ending Reconstruction.

1883: William F. Cody (Buffalo Bill) had his first Wild West Show.

1884: The construction of the first American 10-story building began in Chicago, IL.

1889: Asa Candler published a full-page advertisement in The Atlanta Journal, proclaiming his wholesale and retail drug business as "sole proprietors of Coca-Cola . Delicious. Refreshing. Exhilarating. Invigorating." Mr. Candler did not actually achieve sole ownership until 1891 at a cost of $2,300.

1898: The U.S. Navy under Dewey defeated the Spanish fleet at Manila Bay in the Philippines.

1905: In New York, radium was tested as a cure for cancer.

1912: In London's Kensington Gardens, a statue of Peter Pan was erected.

1915: A German submarine sank the U.S. ship Gulflight.

1922: Charlie Robertson of the Chicago White Sox pitched a perfect no-hit, no-run game against the Detroit Tigers. The Sox won 3-0. Another perfect game did not come along until 46 years later.

1927: Adolf Hitler held his first Nazi meeting in Berlin.

1931: The Empire State Building in New York was dedicated and opened. It was 102 stories tall and was the tallest building in the world at the time.

1934: The Philippine legislature accepted a U.S. proposal for independence.

1937: U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt signed an act of neutrality, keeping the United States out of World War II.

1941: "Citizen Kane," directed and starring Orson Welles, premiered in New York.

1944: The Messerschmitt Me 262, the first combat jet, made its first flight.

1945: Martin Bormann, private secretary to Adolf Hitler, escaped from the Fuehrerbunker as the Red Army advanced on Berlin.

1945: Admiral Karl Doenitz succeeded Hitler as leader of the Third Reich. This was one day after Hitler committed suicide.

1948: The People's Democratic Republic of Korea (North Korea) was proclaimed.

1950: Gwendolyn Brooks became the first African American to win the Pulitzer Prize for her book of poetry called Annie Allen.

1958: James Van Allen reported that two radiation belts encircled Earth.

1960: Francis Gary Powers' U-2 spy plane was shot down over the Soviet Union. Powers was taken prisoner.

1961: Fidel Castro announced there would be no more elections in Cuba.

1967: Anastasio Somoza Debayle became president of Nicaragua.

1968: In the second day of battle, U.S. Marines, with the support of naval fire, continue their attack on a North Vietnamese Division at Dai Do.

1969: Leonard Tose bought the NFL's Philadelphia Eagles for $16,155,000.

1970: Students at Kent State University riot in downtown Kent, OH, in protest of the American invasion of Cambodia.

1971: The National Railroad Passenger Corp. (Amtrak) went into service. It was established by the U.S. Congress to run the nation's intercity railroads.

1981: The Japanese government announced that it would limit passenger car exports to the United States over the next three years.

1986: The Tass News Agency reported the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

1986: Bill Elliott set a stock car speed record with his Ford Thunderbird in Talladega, AL. Elliott reached a speed of 212.229 mph.

1989: Disney-MGM Studios opened.
Disney movies, music and books

1992: On the third day of the Los Angeles riots resulting from the Rodney King beating trial. King appeared in public to appeal for calm, he asked, "Can we all get along?"

1998: Arrow Air was fined $5 million for using spare parts that lacked federal approval in the U.S.

1999: On Mount Everest, a group of U.S. mountain climbers discovered the body of George Mallory. Mallory had died in June of 1924 while trying to become the first person to reach the summit of Everest. At the time of the discovery it was unclear whether or not Mallory had actually reached the summit.

2000: ABC aired the first celebrity "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire."


TODAY IN HISTORY: Dedication of the Empire State Building (May 1, 1931)

New York City’s Empire State Building was dedicated on this day in 1931. The iconic building was designed by the architectural firm of Shreve, Lamb and Harmon using earlier designs, for the Reynolds Building in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Construction began on January 22, 1930.

The Empire State building’s spire was designed to be a mooring mast and depot for lighter than air craft such as diragibles, but proved too dangerous after the first few attempts. The Empire State building was the tallest skyscraper until the construction of the World Trade Center in 1972. The iconic building was also surpassed by the Sears Tower in Chicago.

The destruction of the World Trade Center in 2001, put the Empire State Building (temporarily) back on top as the tallest skyscraper in New York City.


UPI Almanac for Friday, May 1, 2015

Today is Friday, May 1, the 121st day of 2015 with 244 to follow.

The moon is waxing. Morning stars are Neptune, Uranus and Saturn. Evening stars are Jupiter, Mars, Mercury and Venus.

Those born on this date are under the sign of Taurus. They include Arthur Wellesley, the first duke of Wellington, in 1769 sharpshooter Calamity Jane, real name Martha Jane Cannary Burke, in 1852 U.S. Army Gen. Mark Clark in 1896 singer Kate Smith in 1907 actor Louis Nye in 1913 actor Glenn Ford in 1916 television personality Jack Paar in 1918 actor Dan O'Herlihy in 1919 author Joseph Heller in 1923 game show host Art Fleming in 1924 Mercury astronaut Scott Carpenter in 1925 singer Sonny James in 1929 (age 86) singer Judy Collins in 1939 (age 76) singer Rita Coolidge in 1945 (age 70) Hong Kong film director John Woo in 1946 (age 69) jockey Steve Cauthen in 1960 (age 55) singer Tim McGraw in 1967 (age 48) actor Emilia Clarke in 1987 (age 28).

In 1884, construction began on the world's first skyscraper -- the 10-story Home Insurance Co. building in Chicago.

In 1893, U.S. President Grover Cleveland opened the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago.

In 1898, during the Spanish-American war, forces under U.S. Navy Adm. George Dewey routed the Spanish fleet in the Philippines.

In 1931, the Empire State Building was dedicated in New York City. (At 102 stories, it was the world's tallest building for 40 years.)

In 1960, the Soviet Union shot down an American U-2 spy plane flown by Francis Gary Powers, who was captured.

In 1971, Amtrak, the U.S. national rail service that combined the operations of 18 passenger railroads, went into service.

In 1991, Rickey Henderson of the Oakland Athletics stole his 939th base, making him the all-time leader Nolan Ryan of the Texas Rangers pitched his record seventh no-hitter.

In 1993, Sri Lankan President Ranasinghe Premadasa and others in his entourage were killed in a suicide bomb blast.

In 1997, 18 years of Conservative Party rule in Great Britain ended with a Labor Party victory in elections, allowing party leader Tony Blair to succeed John Majors as prime minister.

In 1999, Charismatic, a 31-1 long shot, won the 125th Kentucky Derby.

In 2001, a former member of the Ku Klux Klan was convicted in Birmingham, Ala., in a 1963 church bombing that killed four black girls. (He was given four life sentences.)

In 2003, U.S. President George W. Bush, speaking from the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln, declared that major combat in Iraq was over and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld announced the end of major U.S. combat operations in Afghanistan.

In 2005, five men in Madain, Iraq, confessed to the kidnapping and slaying of British aid worker Margaret Hassan.

In 2008, the U.S. Congress gave final approval to a bill making it illegal for employers and insurance companies to discriminate on the basis of genetic history. (It became law May 24.)

In 2009, U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Souter announced he would retire in June. He was on the court 19 years.

In 2010, thousands of tourists and theatergoers were evacuated from New York's Times Square area for more than 8 hours so police could disarm a malfunctioned bomb found in an SUV, parked with its motor running and smoke coming from rear vents. (Faisal Shahzad was later sentenced to life in prison for the bombing attempt.)

In 2011, President Barack Obama announced at 11:35 p.m. Eastern time that al-Qaida founder Osama bin Laden, architect of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States and the face of global terrorism, was killed in a U.S. commando raid (May 2 Pakistan time) on his compound near the Pakistani capital.

In 2012, U.S. President Barack Obama, speaking from Afghanistan in a televised address to Americans, said Afghans will be "fully responsible" for their security by 2014.

In 2013, Chris Kelly of the rap duo Kris Kross died at the age of 34. (The medical examiner's office in Atlanta later announced the cause of death was a drug overdose.)

A thought for the day: "You find out who your real friends are when you're involved in a scandal." -- Elizabeth Taylor


This Day in History: 05/01/1931 - Empire State Building dedicated - HISTORY

Empire State Building

On this day in 1931, President Herbert Hoover officially dedicated the Empire State Building as the tallest building in the world. The New York City skyscraper would retain the title for nearly 40 years until the World Trade Center was built in 1972. Today, the K in Dubai claims the honor as tallest building in the world standing at 2717 ft. In 1931, however, the Empire State Building was, and continues to be, an architectural wonder and iconic masterpiece in the Big Apple skyline.

The building was less of an artistic contribution to the city skyline and more of a business competition.

John Jakob Raskob, CFO of General Motors and the mastermind behind the 1454 foot high building planned to create a skyscraper taller than the tallest building in the world at the time – the Chrysler Building. The Chrysler Motor Company was a major competitor in the day.

When jobs were scarce in the Great Depression, Raskob’s construction team hired 3,400 employees to erect the massive monument that is now one of the most recognizable features in the New York skyline.


UPI Almanac for Monday, May 1, 2017

Today is Monday, May 1, the 121st day of 2017 with 244 to follow.

The moon is waxing. Morning stars are Mercury, Venus, Mars, Uranus, and Neptune. Evening stars are Jupiter and Saturn.

Those born on this date are under the sign of Taurus. They include Arthur Wellesley, the first duke of Wellington, in 1769 sharpshooter Calamity Jane, real name Martha Jane Cannary Burke, in 1852 U.S. Army Gen. Mark Clark in 1896 singer Kate Smith in 1907 actor Louis Nye in 1913 actor Glenn Ford in 1916 television personality Jack Paar in 1918 actor Dan O'Herlihy in 1919 author Joseph Heller in 1923 game show host Art Fleming in 1924 Mercury astronaut Scott Carpenter in 1925 singer Sonny James in 1929 singer Judy Collins in 1939 (age 78) singer Rita Coolidge in 1945 (age 72) Hong Kong film director John Woo in 1946 (age 71) jockey Steve Cauthen in 1960 (age 57) singer Tim McGraw in 1967 (age 50) actor James Badge Dale in 1978 (age 39) actor Jamie Dornan in 1982 (age 35).

In 1884, construction began on the world's first skyscraper -- the 10-story Home Insurance Co. building in Chicago.

In 1893, U.S. President Grover Cleveland opened the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago.

In 1898, during the Spanish-American war, forces under U.S. Navy Adm. George Dewey routed the Spanish fleet in the Philippines.

In 1931, the Empire State Building was dedicated in New York City. At 102 stories, it was the world's tallest building for 40 years.

In 1960, the Soviet Union shot down a U.S. U-2 spy plane flown by Francis Gary Powers, who was captured.

In 1971, Amtrak, the U.S. national rail service that combined the operations of 18 passenger railroads, went into service.

In 1986, a Soviet Embassy official, in a rare appearance before Congress, insisted that the Chernobyl nuclear accident was "not out of hand."

In 1991, Rickey Henderson of the Oakland Athletics stole his 939th base, making him the all-time leader Nolan Ryan of the Texas Rangers pitched his record seventh no-hitter.

In 1993, Sri Lankan President Ranasinghe Premadasa and others in his entourage were killed in a suicide bomb blast.

In 1997, 18 years of Conservative Party rule in Britain ended with a Labor Party victory in elections, allowing party leader Tony Blair to succeed John Majors as prime minister.

In 2001, a former member of the Ku Klux Klan was convicted in Birmingham, Ala., in a 1963 church bombing that killed four black girls. He was given four life sentences.

In 2003, President George W. Bush, speaking from the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln, declared that major combat in Iraq was over and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld announced the end of major U.S. combat operations in Afghanistan.

In 2005, five men in Madain, Iraq, confessed to the kidnapping and slaying of British aid worker Margaret Hassan.

In 2009, U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Souter announced he would retire in June. He served on the court for 19 years.

In 2011, President Barack Obama announced at 11:35 p.m. EDT that al-Qaida founder Osama bin Laden, architect of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States and the face of global terrorism, was killed in a U.S. commando raid (May 2 Pakistan time) on his compound near the Pakistani capital.

In 2012, President Barack Obama, speaking from Afghanistan in a televised address to Americans, said Afghans will be "fully responsible" for their security by 2014.

In 2013, Chris Kelly of the rap duo Kris Kross died at the age of 34. The medical examiner's office in Atlanta later announced the cause of death was a drug overdose.

In 2016, a wildfire in Canada's oil-producing region of Fort McMurray forced the evacuation of more than 90,000 residents from the surrounding area and interrupted about one-quarter of Canada's daily oil production.

A thought for the day: "You find out who your real friends are when you're involved in a scandal." -- Elizabeth Taylor


History & Quotes

In 1884, construction began on the world's first skyscraper -- the 10-story Home Insurance Co. building in Chicago.

In 1893, U.S. President Grover Cleveland opened the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago.

In 1898, during the Spanish-American war, forces under U.S. Navy Adm. George Dewey routed the Spanish fleet in the Philippines.

In 1931, the Empire State Building was dedicated in New York City. At 102 stories, it was the world's tallest building for 40 years.

In 1960, the Soviet Union shot down a U.S. U-2 spy plane flown by Francis Gary Powers, who was captured.

In 1971, Amtrak, the U.S. national rail service that combined the operations of 18 passenger railroads, went into service.

In 1985, President Ronald Reagan banned trade with Nicaragua to try to undermine the Sandinista government. President George H.W. Bush lifted the embargo in 1990.

In 1986, a Soviet Embassy official, in a rare appearance before Congress, insisted that the Chernobyl nuclear accident was not out of hand.

In 1991, Rickey Henderson of the Oakland Athletics stole his 939th base, making him the all-time leader.

In 1991, Nolan Ryan of the Texas Rangers pitched his record seventh no-hitter.

In 1993, Sri Lankan President Ranasinghe Premadasa and others in his entourage were killed in a suicide bomb blast.

In 1997, 18 years of Conservative Party rule in Britain ended with a Labor Party victory in elections, allowing party leader Tony Blair to succeed John Majors as prime minister.

In 1999, a meeting between the Rev. Jesse Jackson and Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic led to the release of three U.S. soldiers captured a month earlier by Serbian troops.

In 2001, a former member of the Ku Klux Klan was convicted in Birmingham, Ala., in a 1963 church bombing that killed four black girls. He was given four life sentences.

In 2003, President George W. Bush, speaking from the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln, declared that major combat in Iraq was over and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld announced the end of major U.S. combat operations in Afghanistan.

In 2005, five men in Madain, Iraq, confessed to the kidnapping and slaying of British aid worker Margaret Hassan.

In 2009, U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Souter announced he would retire in June. He served on the court for 19 years.

In 2011, President Barack Obama announced at 11:35 p.m. EDT that al-Qaida founder Osama bin Laden, architect of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States and the face of global terrorism, was killed in a U.S. commando raid (May 2 Pakistan time) on his compound near the Pakistani capital.

In 2019, a British court sentenced WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to 50 weeks in jail for skipping bail in 2012.

In 2020, the Food and Drug Administration granted emergency use authorization for the antiviral drug remdesivir -- made by biopharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences -- to treat COVID-19.


Article - History

The view from the Empire State Building of the World Trade Center, Central Park, and the Chrysler Building is simply amazing. But did you ever think that view could become even more incredible?

On October 12, the Empire State Building’s renovated 102nd-floor observatory was opened to the public. The highest floor of the building now provides a panoramic view of Manhattan.

For an extra $20, visitors can see the new observatory which is sixteen floors higher than the previous 86th-floor observatory. The construction for the 102nd floor of the building started in January 2019 and cost 165 million dollars.

History Of The Building

Did you know that the Empire State Building was born out of a competition between two businessmen to build the tallest skyscraper?

Walter Chrysler of the car-maker Chrysler Corporation had commissioned the construction of the Chrysler building in Manhattan. Not to be outdone, Jakob Raskob of General Motors put together a group of investors. In 1929, they purchased a property and hired William F. Lamb, an architect, to design a skyscraper.

The building was designed in the art-deco style which was very popular in the 1920s and 1930s. This style is characterized by bold colors, straight lines, and ornamental designs using different materials in geometric patterns. It was also designed to have a tapered structure for a reason. In 1916, New York City passed a Zoning Act which included regulation on building height. To allow light and air to reach the sidewalks. buildings beyond a certain height had to reduce their width in steps, giving them a tapered, pencil-like design.

On May 1, 1931, the Empire State Building was inaugurated by President Herbert Hoover.

A Few Fun Facts

  • More than 250 movies and TV shows have shot scenes at the Empire State Building such as An Affair to Remember, Elf, and The Amazing Spider-Man. There is also an exhibit on the second floor dedicated to the 1933 movie King Kong.
  • The Empire State Building is also named as one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers.
  • Every year, couples get married on February 14, Valentine’s Day on the 80th floor and become part of the Empire State Building Wedding Club. They are allowed free admission to the building on their wedding anniversaries.
  • The building also hosts an annual race to reach the 86th floor via stairs. The fastest record is credited to an Australian man, Paul Crake, who ran up the stairs in 9 minutes and 30 seconds.
  • In 1986, Alastair Boyd and Michael McCarthy decided to skydive from the 86th floor of the Empire State Building. They secretly hid their parachutes and bought tickets to the observatory on the 86th floor. They managed to land safely, however, they were both charged with “reckless endangerment” and “unlawful parachuting.”
  • Due to the many businesses situated in the Empire State Building, it even has its own zip code!


Watch the video: Empire State Building Dedicated - 1931. Today In History. 1 May 17 (July 2022).


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