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Leonard F. Mason DD- 852 - History

Leonard F. Mason DD- 852 - History


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Leonard F. Mason DD- 852

Leonard F. Mason
(DD-852: dp. 2,425; 1. 300'6"; b. 41'1", dr. 18', s. 34.5 k.; cpl. 367; a. 3 5", 12 40mm., 10 20mm., 2 dct., 6 dcp.; cl. Gearing)

Leonard F. Mason (DD-852) was laid down 2 May 1915 by the Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass.; launched 4 January 1946: sponsored hy Mrs. Hillary Mason, mother of Private First Class Mason; and commissioned 28 June 1946, Comdr. S. D. B. Merrill in command.

Following shakedown in the Caribbean, the new destroyer joined DesDiv 32 in the Pacific 22 January 1947. From 1947 to 1950, the ship completed two cruises in the western Pacific, as well as stateside operations. During the early stages of the Korean war, Leonard F. Mason steamed for the Pacific 13 November 1950 and joined in antisubmarine exercises. On 16 May she joined TF 85 at the siege of Wonsan to fire in the continuous shore bombardment which inflicted heavy damage on enemy bridges, tunnels, and troop concentrations. Departing Wonsan 23 July. she steamed for San Diego, arriving 8 August 1951.

After overhaul, the ship sailed 23 February 1952 for the Orient, and again operated in Wonsan Harbor and along the eastern coast of Korea. Departing Yokosuka 13 Sep. tember, she arrived Long Beach 27 September and remained there until 16 May 1953 when she again steamed for the Far East. Arriving in Korean waters 9 June Leonard F. Mason joined TG 70.1 for escort and bombardment action with mighty battleship New Jersey off Wonsan and in the Yellow Sea.

After the close of Korean hostilities, she departed Yokosuka 20 November for Long Beach, arrived 8 December, and readied herself for peacetime duty. Between 1954 and 1960 Leonard F. Mason made three more WestPae cruises, providing an element of security in the turbulent Far East. During the Suez crisis of November 1956 she sailed with fast carrier TF 11 on guard against any spread of trouble to the Far East.

From May 1960 to May 1962, Leonard F. Mason was homeported at Yokosuka for antisubmarine patrols and other peacekeeping missions. During 1963 she underwent FRAM I conversion at Boston Naval Shipyard, then returned by way of the west coast to Yokosuka 21 July 1964. For the next 2 years, she operated with various task groups of the 7th Fleet. conducting gunfire support missions off the coast of Vietnam, patrolling in the Taiwan Straits, and serving in the Gemini Recovery Force. Long experience and training paid off 17 March 1966 when Gemini VIII splashed down £southeast of`Okinawa. Leonard F. Mason had Astronauts Ma;. David Scott, TJSAF, and Mr.Neil Armstrong and their capsule aboard within 3 hours and was headed for Okinawa, where her distinguished passengers and cargo were off loaded the next day.

Leonard F. Mason then returned to gunfire support chores off Vietnam until June. With an overhaul projected, her home port changed to Long Beach, Calif. She departed Yokosuka 17 June and arrived at the west coast 2 July. The remainder of the year was spent in diverse operations off the California coast, with a trip to Alcapulco in November.

On 3 January 1967 the destroyer entered San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, for overhaul. She returned to Long Beach in May. then resumed local operations, including 6 weeks of refresher training. On 19 September she departed for WestPac, w here she conducted plane guard duty on Yankee Station and naval gunfire support, until sailing for home, arriving Long Beach 12 March. Her stay was not long, however, for she left once again for the Far Fast at the end of July. Yokosuka again became her home port 19 August 18, and she continued to operate w ith the 7th Fleet, ranging from Japan to the South China Sea into 1963.

Leonard F. Mason received three battle stars for European service.


Leonard Foster Mason was born on February 22, 1920, in Middlesboro, Kentucky, the child of Hillery Mason, Sr. (1894–1957) and Mollie Partin (1897–1990). [2] He had at least 11 siblings. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in April 1943 and was promoted to private first class in March 1944.

During the landing on Guam, on July 22, 1944, two enemy machine guns opened fire on Mason's platoon. Although mortally wounded, Mason cleared out the hostile position, acting on his own initiative. His heroic act in the face of almost certain death enabled his platoon to accomplish its mission. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor. Mason died the following day of his wounds.

At the time of his passing, he was married to Donna Potts (later Sites 1923-1989). The two had one child, Larry Eugene Mason. [3]

Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: February 2, 1920, Middlesboro, Ky. Accredited to: Ohio.

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as an automatic rifleman serving with the 2d Battalion, 3d Marines, 3d Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on the Asan-Adelup Beachhead, Guam, Marianas Islands on 22 July 1944. Suddenly taken under fire by 2 enemy machineguns not more than 15 yards away while clearing out hostile positions holding up the advance of his platoon through a narrow gully, Pfc. Mason, alone and entirely on his own initiative, climbed out of the gully and moved parallel to it toward the rear of the enemy position. Although fired upon immediately by hostile riflemen from a higher position and wounded repeatedly in the arm and shoulder, Pfc. Mason grimly pressed forward and had just reached his objective when hit again by a burst of enemy machinegun fire, causing a critical wound to which he later succumbed. With valiant disregard for his own peril, he persevered, clearing out the hostile position, killing 5 Japanese, wounding another and then rejoining his platoon to report the results of his action before consenting to be evacuated. His exceptionally heroic act in the face of almost certain death enabled his platoon to accomplish its mission and reflects the highest credit upon Pfc. Mason and the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

In 2013, the City of Middlesboro, Kentucky renamed a portion of Cumberland Avenue, the main street downtown, in his honor it is now known as Leonard F. Mason Medal of Honor Memorial Highway.


SHIP'S HISTORY

Leonard F. Mason (DD-852) was laid down 2 May 1945 by the Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass. launched 4 January 1946: sponsored by Mrs. Hillery Mason, mother of Private First Class Mason and commissioned 28 June 1946, Comdr.
S. D. B. Merrill in command.

Following shakedown in the Caribbean, the new destroyer joined DesDiv 32 in
the Pacific 22 January 1947. From 1947 to 1950, the ship completed two cruises in the western Pacific, as well as stateside operations. During the early stages of the Koren war, Leonard F. Mason steamed for the Pacific 13 November 1950 and joined in antisubmarine exercises. On 16 May she joined TF 85 at the siege
of Wonsan to fire in the continuous shore bombardment which inflicted heavy damage on enemy bridges, tunnels, and troop concentrations. Departing Wonsan 23 July, she steamed for San Diego, arriving 8 August 1951.

After overhaul, the ship sailed 23 February 1952 for the Orient, and again operated in Wonsan Harbor and along the eastern coast of Korea. Departing Yokosuka 13 September, she arrived Long Beach 27 September and remained there until 16 May 1953 when she again steamed for the Far East. Arriving in Korean waters 9 June, Leonard F. Mason joined TG 70.1 for escort and bombardment action with mighty battleship New Jersey off Wonsan and in the Yellow Sea.

After the close of Korean hostilities, she departed Yokosuka 20 November for Long Beach, arrived 8 December, and readied herself for peacetime duty. Between 1954 and 1960 Leonard F. Mason made three more WestPac cruises, providing an element of security in the turbulent Far East. During the Suez crisis of November 1956 she sailed with fast carrier TF 11 on guard against any spread of trouble to the Far East.

From May 1960 to May 1962, Leonard F. Mason was homeported at Yokosuka for antisubmarine patrols and other peacekeeping missions. During 1963 she underwent FRAM I conversion at Boston Naval Shipyard, then returned by way of the west coast to Yokosuka 21 July 1964. For the next 2 years, she operated with various task groups of the 7th Fleet, conducting gunfire support missions off the coast of Vietnam, patrolling in the Taiwan Straits, and serving in the Gemini Recovery Force. Long experience and training paid off 17 March 1966 when Gemini VIII splashed down southeast of Okinawa. Leonard F. Mason had Astronauts Maj. David Scott, USAF, and Mr. Neil Armstrong and their capsule aboard within 3 hours and was headed for Okinawa, where her distinguished passengers and cargo were offloaded the next day.

Leonard F. Mason then returned to gunfire support chores off Vietnam until June. With an overhaul projected, her home port changed to Long Beach, Calif. She departed Yokosuka 17 June and arrived at the west coast 2 July. The remainder of the year was spent in diverse operations off the California coast, with a trip to Acapulco in November.

On 5 January 1967 the destroyer entered San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, for overhaul. She returned to Long Beach in May, then resumed local operations, including 6 weeks of refresher training. On 19 September she
departed for WestPac, where she conducted plane guard duty on Yankee Station and naval gunfire support, until sailing for home, arriving Long Beach 12 March. Her stay was not long, however, for she left once again for the Far East at the
end of July. Yokosuka again became her home port 19 August 1968, and she continued to operate with the 7th Fleet, ranging from Japan to the South China Sea into 1969.


LEONARD F MASON DD 852

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Gearing Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid 6 August 1945 - Launched 4 January 1946

Struck from Naval Register 2 November 1976

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.

Postmark Type
---
Killer Bar Text

Commissioning, cachet by William Frederick. From the Bob Govern collection.

Cachet by George V. Sadworth. Typed notation "Last Day Free Mail"

USCS Postmark
Catalog Illus. L-10

Other Information

USS LEONARD F. MASON earned the Combat Action Ribbon w/ 1 star, the Navy Unit Commendation Ribbon, the Navy Meritorious Unit Citation Ribbon, the China Service Medal, the World War II Victory Medal, the Navy Occupation Medal (Korea), the National Defense Medal w/ 1 star, the Korea Service Medal w/ 1 silver star & 1 bronze star, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal w/ 1 silver star, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon w/ 1 star, the Republic of Vietnam Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon, the United Nations Korea Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal and the Korea War Service Medal during her Naval career.

NAMESAKE - Private First Class Leonard Foster Mason, USMC (22 February 1920 - 22 July 1944).
Mason, born Middleboro, Ky., enlisted in the Marine Corps in April 1943. Promoted to private first class in March 1943, Mason was sent to the Pacific war zone in October. During the landing on Guam 22 July 1944, two enemy machineguns opened fire on Mason’s platoon. Although mortally wounded, Mason cleared out the hostile position, acting on his own initiative. His heroic act in the face of almost certain death enabled his platoon to accomplish its mission. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

Ships sponsor was Mrs. Hillary Mason, mother of PFC Mason.

If you have images or information to add to this page, then either contact the Curator or edit this page yourself and add it. See Editing Ship Pages for detailed information on editing this page.


Leonard F. Mason DD- 852 - History

The USS Leonard F Mason was named for

Leonard Foster Mason, born Middleboro, Ky., 22 February 1920, enlisted in the Marine Corps in April 1943. Promoted to private first class in March 1943, Mason was sent to the Pacific war zone in October. During the landing on Guam 22 July 1944, two enemy machineguns opened fire on Mason&rsquos platoon. Although mortally wounded, Mason cleared out the hostile position, acting on his own initiative. His heroic act in the face of almost certain death enabled his platoon to accomplish its mission. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. Photo from the USMC History Division.

USS LEONARD F. MASON (DD-852)

CLASS - GEARING As Built.
Displacement 3460 Tons (Full), Dimensions, 390' 6"(oa) x 40' 10" x 14' 4" (Max)
Armament 6 x 5"/38AA (3x2), 12 x 40mm AA, 11 x 20mm AA, 10 x 21" tt.(2x5).
Machinery, 60,000 SHP General Electric Geared Turbines, 2 screws
Speed, 36.8 Knots, Range 4500 [email protected] 20 Knots, Crew 336.
Operational and Building Data
Laid down by Bethlehem Steel,Quincy. August 6 1945.
Launched January 4 1946 and commissioned June 28 1946.
Completed FRAM upgrade January 1964.

After the Upgrade


PFC LEONARD F. MASON

Leonard Foster Mason was born in Middlesboro, Kentucky on
February 22, 1920, the fourth of 13 children and the first son of
Hillary and Mollie Rachel (Partin) Mason. He enlisted in the United
States Marine Corps in April 1942 at Cleveland, Ohio and was
promoted to Private First Class in March 1943. He was stationed
at Marine barracks for training at Paris Island, South Carolina,
then at the Naval Proving Ground, Indian Head, Maryland and finally
at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Odered into the field in October 1943, he was sent to the Pacfic and served as as Automatic Rifleman.

He was wounded in an attack on Japanese forces on Guam on July 22, 1944, and died aboard the APA-42, USS Elmore, an amphibious assault transport the following day, He was
awarded the Medal of Honor and the Purple Heart.

Granite Block has been placed at the Veterans Freedom Flag in Lima, Ohio honoring our Ship and crew


The table below contains the names of sailors who served aboard the USS Leonard F. Mason (DD 852). Please keep in mind that this list does only include records of people who submitted their information for publication on this website. If you also served aboard and you remember one of the people below you can click on the name to send an email to the respective sailor. Would you like to have such a crew list on your website?

Looking for US Navy memorabilia? Try the Ship's Store.

There are 99 crew members registered for the USS Leonard F. Mason (DD 852).

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1965 | 1966 &ndash 1972 | 1973 &ndash now

NameRank/RatePeriodDivisionRemarks/Photo
Mullennix, Pat MoeQM31973 &ndash 1976QMTrying to find old buddies
Trinidad, LeonardBT3Feb 1973 &ndash Sep 1975B divisionserving aboard the USS Leonard F Mason with the best in the Navy. Hard working man with little sleep. With instruction from ncos Chief coor and BT1 Hand we were the best. Would like to contact BT3 Holloman & FN fox
Buettner, RobRM3Feb 2, 1973 &ndash Nov 2, 1976OCMember decommissioning crew
Charlton, WilliamETN31974 &ndash Nov 1976Operations/ElectronicsServed w/ Jennings Johnson (my father-in-law!), Adam Lorenc, Vic Murata, Vince Mancuso, Wayne Stephenson, "Scottie", others. Did last WestPac. Decommissioned the boat at Port of Seattle. (I miss Ivars) RIP Doc!
Curry, AdairBTFA1974 &ndash 1975B DivisionI learned a lot while I was assigned to the Mason quite a difference from the carrier I served on.
Smith, Bruce STG2Feb 1974 &ndash Sep 19763rdInteresting experience to say the least. but a great crew.
Rodgers, RichardBtfnAug 18, 1974 &ndash Nov 21, 1976B Loved rimpac 75 the cerimony in remembrance of pvt first class Leonard f. Mason USMC in Guam. Enjoyed stop off a Fuji beautiful island and New Zealand was also beautiful. Decommissioning mason was something
Hardy, BobBTFNSep 1974 &ndash Nov 2, 1976
Pompa, RuebenHT-3Sep 3, 1974 &ndash Nov 1976B and HT.I would like to say hi to the crew members and that I am retired from civil service. Friends on board Trinidad, Flores, Shorty, Mike and Garcia / ones can't remember the names. The best destroyer ever Leonard f Mason.
Vasich, Michael ( Cactus )BT 3 Forward fire roomDec 20, 1974 &ndash 1976B DivisionGreat memories espeicially in Seattle getting de-commisioned.
Gillette, CharlesHtfnFeb 5, 1975 &ndash Nov 2, 1976Hull tech
Jones, RoyaleETR2Apr 1975 &ndash Nov 1976Ops
Kuykendall, MelvinEW 1Jun 30, 1975 &ndash Nov 1, 1976OPERATIONS
Tribelhorn, RonaldLT.Aug 1975 &ndash Nov 1976 Last Engineering Officer, last Westpac & decommissioned her in Seattle
Wilson, WilYNSNAug 1975 &ndash Nov 1976BMI came on board the Leaky Leonard in Guam and decommissioned the ship in Seattle, Washington. I later went on to serve 3 more years on the USS Point Defiance.

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1965 | 1966 &ndash 1972 | 1973 &ndash now


Leonard F. Mason DD- 852 - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

USS LEONARD F. MASON
(DD-852)

Launched on 4 January 1946 at Quincy, Massachusetts, the LEONARD F. MASON was commissioned on 28 June 1946. Early in 1947 she began alternating deployments on China Station with operations out of San Diego. During exercises off Hawaii in April 1949, a collision with the FECHTELER (DD-870) put a six-foot hole in her bow that flooded the forward peak tank. By April 1951 she was off Korea screening carriers during air strikes and participating in the siege of Wonsan. Her gunfire raked enemy railroad and highway bridges, tunnels, marshaling yards, troop concentrations, and gun emplacements.

The MASON began 1952 en route to Korea with the RUPERTUS (DD-851) and H.W. TUCKER (DD-875). There she joined the BRINKLEY BASS (DD-887) in Wonsan Harbor returning fire from shore batteries until the STICKELL (DD-888) relieved her. Hunter-killer exercises in the Taiwan Straits and stints on the bomb line took her into 1953.

Over the next three years she operated on the West Coast with regular deployments to the Far East. She served with carriers during the Middle East crisis in 1956 and the crisis in Laos in 1961. In 1963, the MASON’s FRAM I conversion included installation of ASROC and DASH systems. The North Vietnamese PT-boat attack on the destroyers MADDOX (DD-731) and TURNER JOY (DD-951) sent her on the first of several Vietnam deployments. Her wartime duties were interrupted in March 1966 to recover the Gemini 8 capsule and astronauts David Scott and Neil Armstrong after their emergency landing in the Western Pacific. She continued to support Allied combat operations in Vietnam and engage in Linebacker strikes against North Vietnamese positions and also did her share of search and rescue missions in the Tonkin Gulf. At various times she operated with the J. R. CRAIG (DD-885), CARPENTER (DD-825), MAHAN (DLG-11), and FRANCIS HAMMOND (DE-1067).

During 1972, she operated along the West Coast with the CHEVALIER (DD-805), FOX (DLG-33), DECATUR (DDG-31), O’CALLAHAN (DE-1051), HORNE (DLG-30), ORLECK (DD-886), REEVES (DLG-24), BAINBRIDGE (DLGN-25), RAMSEY (DEG-2), BRONSTEIN (DE-1037), and J. R. CRAIG. At year’s end she relieved the SHELTON (DD-790) on search and rescue duty during U.S. Air Force and Navy night air raids on enemy missile positions around Hanoi and Haiphong.

Robert L. Warren, her skipper at the time, recalled that the ship’s crew gave up sleep to watch the late night show. With lights on to avoid midair collisions, the Air Force B-52s and Navy aircraft looked like giant fireflies zigzagging across a sky laced with fiery missile trails. Later the MASON replaced the BORDELON (DD-881) and joined the LAWRENCE (DDG-4) and CONE (DD-866) for Linebacker operations. Retiring under heavy fire from shore batteries, she earned the nickname “Racin’ MASON” when she outran her fellow DDs and did it using just two boilers. Said one CO, “I couldn’t believe the MASON was going faster on two boilers than we could using four.”

While on a shore bombardment mission, the MASON fired a chaff canister that fell back and landed on her fantail. It released its contents and lit up enemy radar screens like New Year’s Eve fireworks. Trailing chaff as she followed a zigzag course, the MASON was a brightly lit target and soon drew intense enemy fire. She set an unofficial Tonkin Gulf record not only for most shells received but for the most that failed to hit their target. To heighten the drama, one of those near misses temporarily knocked out her steering control. Observers on other ships held their collective breath until the MASON regained steering and steamed out of danger. Her chaff display and amazing survival were the talk of the gulf that night. The end of the event did not come until many weeks later when the destroyer went into drydock where they discovered that on the night of the chaff incident, the starboard rudder shaft had been shattered. Ever since, they’d been operating with just one rudder.

The MASON began 1973 bombarding enemy positions north of the DMZ, on the gun line at Quang Tri, and with the TRUXTON (DLGN-35) on search and rescue duty. She returned to the gun line with the MORTON (DD-948), O’CALLAHAN, BAUSSEL (DD-845), MCCAFFERY (DD-860), HENDERSON (DD-785), and HORNE. Later, she covered minesweepers clearing Haiphong Harbor with the WORDEN (DLG-18) and took part in exercises with the GURKE (DD-783), BROOKE (DEG-1/FFG-1), and EPPERSON (DD-719).

Alternating Western Pacific (WESTPAC) deployments with stateside tours in 1974, she operated at various times with the ALBERT DAVID (DE-1050), WADDELL (DDG-24), HOEL (DDG-13), WORDEN (DLG-18), RICHARD B. ANDERSON (DD786), BRADLEY (DE-1041), TURNER JOY, JOUETT (DLG-29), RICHARD S. EDWARDS (DD-950), HEPBURN (DE-1055), GEORGE K. MACKENZIE (DD-836), BRONSTEIN, DOWNES (DE-1070), ROARK (DE-1053), BROOKE (DEG-1), and BAGLEY (DE-1069).


Sunday Ship History: Astronaut recovery destroyers


Maybe you can't remember the days when American astronauts blasted off in "capsules" instead of shuttles, or maybe you know them only through videos or movies like Apollo 13 or television history shows. So you'll have to take my word for it that back in the old days U.S. spacecraft didn't glide to earth and roll to a stop on long runways. Instead, they plopped into the ocean and, for the most part, floated around until the astronauts and the capsules were recovered by helicopters and ships. The ships designated as "Prime Recovery Ships" were flat deck helicopter carriers, but there were also "Secondary Recovery Ships" in place to handle recovery in the event of. something going wrong. And sometimes things did go wrong.

On three occasions, U.S. Navy destroyers became "Prime Recovery Ships". These were USS Noa (DD-841), USS John R. Pierce (DD-753), and USS Leonard F Mason (DD-852).

Let's look at Mason's recovery job.

On March 16, 1966, two astronauts blasted off in a Gemini capsule mounted on a Titan rocket. The mission was Gemini 8:

The early landing in the Pacific meant that the Primary Recovery Ship was not available. A Secondary Recovery Ship would have to do the job, and that ship was USS Leonard F. Mason (DD-852).

Mason was pretty much an ordinary FRAM Gearing-class destroyer. Built too late for WWII. She served with distinction in the Korean War and on the gunline off Vietnam (allegedly the last U.S. warhip to visit Danang in 1973).



On March 16, 1966, Mason recoved Gemini 8 and its two astronauts. Of course, one the men recovered from the sea went on to some fame as the first man to step foot on the moon, Astronaut Neil Armstrong. That moon landing took place only a little over 3 years from his recovery from the Pacific by a destroyer. More on the recovery of Gemini 8 and Mason's 30-knot run to get to the capsule here.

Neil Armstrong on the moon:


USS Leonard F. Mason DD-852

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Watch the video: Underway Replenishment Tonkin Gulf 1973 (July 2022).


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